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Ok boys and girls; if you don't see yourself working for first chair, maybe you're destined to take you violin skills to another 21 Century level. Here is Jason Wang again playing his electric violin with some electronic distortion effects happening for a hard rock - guitar sound. You can literally close your eyes and imagine this is a heavy metal lead guitar playing.

It may not be your cup of tea music wise, but watch Jason's face and see how much fun he's having playing this for us.



9 Responses
Posted: December 5, 2011
Last Comment: December 7, 2011
Replies

Eileen
Posted: December 7, 2011
Beth, that sounds like fun music to play.  I think you have a little clip of your band on the "About Us" page playing Ill-Tempered Tiple.   I'd love to play in a group like that..but have to get better first !  ;-)


Posted: December 7, 2011
Absolutely fantastic. What a great player. I love the kick when he gets the footpedals going. He really sings. Keep the links going, I'm definitely enjoying them.


Posted: December 6, 2011
I love the model Jason uses. Of course the peg box is modern, there isn't any f notes in the sound box, but the rest is still a violin. The chin rest and fingering board is ebony, and the the shoulder rest is attached and adjustable foam for angle and height. This is a $2,000 violin and not a toy at all.

It even has a built in pre-amplifier with a headphone jack for quiet practicing in acoustic mode. They're fantastic instruments of modern technology.

Even classical performers who can afford them will have one for convenience.

Maybe someday I will too.


Posted: December 6, 2011
Robert, Thanks for the info on electric violins.

Beth Blackerby
Posted: December 6, 2011
.....with classical technique!!

I too play in a band (Radiola) ;^)  Here is a link to our itunes page.  You can hear me best on Tessitura and Ill-tempered Tiple.

I would say I "rock out" but sort of....lol


Posted: December 6, 2011
I want an Electric Violin! XD 


Posted: December 6, 2011
Michael, this and most electric violins are hollow body, and made of the same fine aged spruce and maple woods as our acoustic models. It has a pizo high density pick up inside, and still has a bridge, and a sounding peg under it. The designs are still basic violin for the highest sound quality possible.

The exceptions are the clear see-through acrylic models mostly made in the U.K.

No matter how we think about it, this is the violin music the new generation loves to listen to. Jason recently appeared on GLEE as I already mentioned.

Jason Yang - remember that name.

And I love all kinds of violin and fiddle music.


When I first saw this one I thought:

Difficulty Level.....

Asian

LOL


Posted: December 5, 2011
I prefer acoustic violin but I must admit he sounds very good playing on a solid body electric violin and it looks like he has good technique.


Posted: December 5, 2011
I forgot to mention that besides becoming a new You Tube super-star, Jason has done many professional performances in the USA I know of, AND he recently appeared last month in the third season, 7th episode of GLEE on TV.

Violin players like Jason are creating a whole new interest in the violin for a new generation that are discovering their own unique sounds and musical expressions. Rock bands today are very popular if they include a talented violinist with the group.

Pick ups are cool but the best new pop sounds are done with electric violins - you can spend some serious money on one, and on the electronics you need to really take the violin music to a dramatic, original level.

This new generation of violin players are just beginning to discover the possibilities for this old instrument, still very relevant and exciting for our new young musicians to explore and make our favorite instrument sing in ways many might have never imagined.

If you like seeing new ways of playing the violin, let me know - otherwise I won't trash this community with stuff that isn't interesting to us.

bob