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Lesley
This discussion includes members-only video content

finger exercise

hi everyone, i just found this simple finger exercise that is probably very useful! a bit like the "taps" in Beth's exercises, but without the violin (can be done anywhere -- on the bus, at the dentist's, waiting in line, watching TV, yatta yatta). the 3rd finger is challenging but it's very gratifying once you do start getting movement (which is surprisingly quick). the actual exercise starts at 0:49.


Lesley
6 Responses
Posted: December 2, 2019
Last Comment: December 2, 2019
Replies

Peter Cranwell
Posted: December 2, 2019
I like it.

I play violin left handed and I'm right handed so I didn't think this would be a problem but I was wrong.

Not sure how much it will help my piano because I rarely trill using my ring finger.

Pete

Lesley
Posted: December 2, 2019
Haha Beth, I'm glad you brought that up -- I did think of poor Schumann when I first saw the video!! and was a bit scared. But then I thought, if you go easy, what could go wrong? Side note: without his piano-playing misadventure, would Mr. Schumann have gone on to write some of the world's greatest  music? As they say, one door closes, another door opens. But I'll keep this real. Since I have zero compositional talent whatsoever, I am very keen to merely strengthen my fingers without ruining them and so will be careful with my tendon ;)

Beth Blackerby
Posted: December 2, 2019
Just be a little careful that you don't strain the tendon. Don't end up like Schumann ;)

Elke Meier
Posted: December 2, 2019
Lesley, it is quite normal that the third finger is not as free as the others. It has to do with the innervation of fingers #2 and 3. So #3 is not immobile, but it is not used to move on its own, independently from #2. And I definitely see improvement in its independence from #2. I can hear a "thwack!" - not as strong as with #1 and 2, but it is there (unlike in the beginning). I can produce a stronger "thwack" with #3, but only if I press #1,2 and 4 down into the surface also - and that, I think, is counterproductive to the overall purpose of the exercise. 

Lesley
Posted: December 2, 2019
Driving! Great idea, Elke -- I find myself behind the wheel more often than I like. Has your third finger become stronger? When I first tried this exercise, my third finger could barely even move (which actually shocked me -- you'd think between typing and violin, it'd be at least mobile). Now it can raise about 1 cm but still only makes the tiniest little tap, compared to the hearty "thwack!" of fingers 1 and 2...

Elke Meier
Posted: December 2, 2019
Ha! This is interesting! I have been doing this especially on long car trips - on my steering wheel. And now I know that this exercise even has a name :). The steering wheel is not the flat surface she wants (the flat area where the steering wheel is connected to the rest of the car is - and it works well there also), but the fingers have to be curved and the movement can still come from the base knuckles. This is often my "comfort" exercise when for some reason or another I don't find time to do real practice :).