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Beth Blackerby
This discussion includes members-only video content


Beth Blackerby
22 Responses
Posted: November 6, 2019
Last Comment: November 12, 2019
Replies

Sonia Lancaster
Posted: November 12, 2019
Sure will Diane. I'm not sure how long it will take me to read, because it suggests the chapters are read and practiced thoroughly before moving on. 

So far the explanations and examples have been clear.

Dianne
Posted: November 12, 2019
Not an inexpensive book! Can you do a brief book review on this when you finish it? It looks like it follows the cello version which looks to have lots on double stop intonation. That is an area I would like to learn more about for sure.

Sonia Lancaster
Posted: November 11, 2019
Another first for me. I downloaded and used one of the pure drones (as opposed to cello drone etc) and heard tartini tones for the first time. I was playing through a scale with the drone and they just popped into my perception.

My new book came as well today. Delving more into the world of intonation.

Deanna Kemler
Posted: November 10, 2019
The new site is really terrific.  The old was so good that I wondered why it needed to be changed, but I really like the new structure and organization.  I like that I can go into a progress level area and have a nice little space to explore and conquer.  There's enough material at each level for it to feel like there's just enough variety and challenge, but not too much.  Good for creating that flow state!  I also just tried playing with a drone and found it meditative.  I was just going to play scales, but ended up improvising for a while.  The drone seems good not only for tuning, but also for unleashing a feeling of expressiveness. 

Elke Meier
Posted: November 10, 2019
Wow, great, thank you! I was looking for a program outside of TE-Tuner but hadn't found one where I liked the tone - I don't like it when the drone is too complex, then I can't hear it very well. And when TE-Tuner is running I cannot use Intonia at the same time. So this is perfect. I have been using their metronome on the laptop for quite some time but wasn't aware of the other programs they have. Thank you again!

Urban Kristan
Posted: November 10, 2019
This program is great for this exercise.

Sonia Lancaster
Posted: November 10, 2019
I tried the new piece with the drone today and really enjoyed it. I will add this to my practice every day now. There is definitely something that happens neurologically with the interplay of tones and how we perceive them. I found the experience quite meditative and relaxing.

Keyvan
Posted: November 9, 2019
Beth/Sonia,
Thank you for clarifying... I have been playing --I mean learning to play-- only for about 4 months now and I can feel a major improvement when using a drone.



Ray
Posted: November 9, 2019
Beth, and so in the case of Minuet No.1 you are covered because it is in the key of G Major and then switches, briefly, to the key of D Major.  A D drone means you are covered for both.

Beth Blackerby
Posted: November 9, 2019
Kevyan, I find that whatever key the piece is in, a good drone to use is the 5th. That was you are covered for all the tonic notes as well has the dominant notes. 

So if the piece is in the key of G, put the drone on a D.

Sonia, the chromatics may be tricky, but one can tune even to a dissonance. You can always stop and change the drone pitch to something that makes the most sense. With a chromatic scale, I'd put the drone pitch on the last note, to make sure I get to the note correctly.

Sonia Lancaster
Posted: November 9, 2019
Thanks Beth for this gem of information. The finer nuances of intonation are something I struggle with. I am looking at new pieces and I think am going to do Chant de Roxane by Szymanowski. It is very chromatic in parts, will the drone help these areas as well? Iíll certainly try the drone.

Keyvan, yes use G if the piece is written in G. Though you can try other drones as well eg a 4th or 5th of the scale (C or D in this case.)

Sonia


Keyvan
Posted: November 9, 2019
The Vlogs and the new site are fantastic, Thank you.

Can anyone help with how to determine which drone (Pitch) to use, I mean if the music is written in the key of G major, do I use a G drone or??? Thanks for any help.


Lesley
Posted: November 7, 2019
Beth, I love this vlog-style posting! Please keep it up! Like everyone else, I too am going to try this method out. Excited! And with a new respect for the instrument... it really demands our best at all times.

Beth Blackerby
Posted: November 7, 2019
Sue, if you use TE tuner, you can actually create a drone with all those pitches. I actually enjoy making multiple note drones. And yes, I do have a video on circle of fifths. It's in the Note reading course, which is also a theory course. :)

Susan Hollister
Posted: November 7, 2019
I'm going to try this!

And I will try the drone as well. There is a chord progression that my teacher is having me practice in the key of G . The diminished 7th is difficult for me in particular :

G- Bb-C#-E-G-Bb-C#-E-G and then down. Should I use a G drone even though it has that C# and E, natural?

And do you have a video that goes in depth about the chord progression and Circle of 5th?

Thank you very much Beth!

Dianne
Posted: November 7, 2019
Ok I think I understand why this works now. When we practice, everything we do is 'learned', so if we play with the drone from the start in tune, we train ourselves to play in tune. Great idea! And slowly. This must be why it was suggested to me to approach every piece 1st excruciatingly slowly, playing each note, forgetting bowings and rhythms at 1st, and getting the notes in tune. To add the drone to this takes it to the next level!

Ann
Posted: November 7, 2019
Hi Beth,

Thank you for sharing, it almost sounds like the frequency of the drone puts you more in tune with yourself and all of your knowledge playing the violin. I have a new tune to learn and will definitely try this!

Ann


Sarah Bondi
Posted: November 6, 2019
Thank you Beth for sharing your story.  Thank you for being so open ...even you get nervous.  I have struggled with nerves all of my life it seems.   I  play with drones every day.  Usually just random notes in the scale.  I love this idea of playing a first time song with a drone.  I usually use cello drones because I love their rich sound.  Does it matter if I play with just one note or do you recommend two as you had in your clip?

Ray
Posted: November 6, 2019
Just came across this video and your timing is uncanny.  I have never played Berceuse.  If I'm rambling its because I've been sick for a couple of days.  But I will make use of the drone.  Its in the key of G Major so I will use G and E being a 5th apart.  Thank you for posting and good luck on your second performance for the music that was given to you way too last minute.  

Soph
Posted: November 6, 2019
Very interesting. I am going to try Brahms Walts for this challenge. I loved behind the scene story of your performance. Is there a video of your performance? Weird how excited I am for this NEVER play out of tune method. 😇

Katja
Posted: November 6, 2019
I have tried this and it was really beneficial. I should do more of it though 🙂.

And please continue doing these kinds of videos - I felt that it was not only informative but I also loved the spontaneity and sincerity of your story.

Dianne
Posted: November 6, 2019
The idea that the drone embeds in the memory and can be accessed when playing the piece is phenomenal.

The only time I've experienced something similar was during orchestral rehearsals & performance- listening to the cellos who seem like a drone- but by that time, the piece has already been practiced.

Look forward to trying this in the practice room.