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Cayla Grobler
Hi everyone,
I am having some trouble with hitting other strings,and I have noticed it tends to happen mostly while I`m crossing strings. Does anyone perhaps know why it happens?

Cayla Grobler
9 Responses
Posted: June 9, 2019
Last Comment: June 13, 2019
Replies

Timothy Smith
Posted: June 13, 2019
I like Beth's description here, "micro changes in my arm level". That about sums it up.

On the subject of where the bow is in relation to the fingerboard and bridge, I was always told to keep the bow in the middle. More recently my teacher  indicated that she sometimes moves the bow depending on the strings she plays. This probably isn't something a beginner should try yet. Her statement threw me back a bit but it makes sense. She might move to the bridge on the lower strings and move closer to the fingerboard on the higher strings. She seems to have developed a keen feel for this over the years. This is like step 10 and I'm on step 3, lol! Something a more developed player might do.

Too close either way and the sound suffers. Closer to bridge means the strings are further spaced maybe making it slightly easier to not hit them for a beginner. It really is like learning to ride a bicycle X 100 in my opinion. So many more variables are at play. I still hit the strings here and there sometimes. It's frustrating. Bow tension might come into play here too. A loose bow will tend to fall lower. Rule of thumb is usually a No2 pencil thickness between the wood and the hair. There seem to be exceptions to every rule. I've seen professional players ( Kevin Burke) play in person and his bow is almost collapsed.

Cayla Grobler
Posted: June 13, 2019
Hi Lesley
I have noticed that I bow a bit too close to the fingerboard. I will start working on bowing closer to the bridge.
Thanks so much for your advice!


Timothy Smith
Posted: June 11, 2019
Dianne's description "overshooting" is a good description in my case. I think maybe as we begin to get more experience our movements start to become more exact? 



Lesley
Posted: June 11, 2019
Hi Cayla, it used to happen to me all the time until I started bowing closer to the bridge. Don't know if this is the case with you too, but maybe worth looking in the mirror or videoing yourself while you bow to see if your bow (like mine) tends to end up closer to the end of the fingerboard...

Cayla Grobler
Posted: June 11, 2019
Hi Dianne,
I think that is exactly what happens to me!

Dianne
Posted: June 10, 2019
Hello Cayla, I do this from time to time when I overshoot strings, and it is an elbow level issue for me. I get too enthusiastic I guess and need to move back to micro movements, or economized movements that do not involve anything beyond what is needed.

Beth Blackerby
Posted: June 10, 2019
Cayla, do you have the practice course? I have several videos addressing that very issue. I also have some good string crossing videos: #23-25, 157, 188-198, 432-435; There are so many reasons why that could be happening: angles issues, sounding point issues. For me it usually has to do with micro changes in my arm level.

Cayla Grobler
Posted: June 10, 2019
Thank you so much!

Ray
Posted: June 9, 2019
Hi Cayla, 

I had the exact same problem.  Timing the string crossings for the right hand and coordinating those right hand techniques with the timing and techniques for those of the left hand can be a challenge .  How I over came my areas of string crossings that needed work was first I separated the techniques for those of the right hand from those of the left hand and then integrated them back together .  

Beth has a wonderful series of videos on this particular area of concern that many people have.  Check out:  videos: 25,37,157,188-194, and 473.

This will take some time but the end result will be that your subconscious will look after your string crossings so that you can then focus on something else.  :)))

Best of luck and looking forward to hearing your next video post.

Ray