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J. David
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Thought I'd put this up for some comments. I was using the "sing it in your head while you play it" technique that Beth described - it really helps to reduce the mistakes and keep things moving along.

I thought the picture in picture was a good idea for seeing things at different angles. It wasn't too hard to accomplish (I had an old camcorder lying around that I used to shoot the left hand).

J. David
13 Responses
Posted: March 25, 2012
Last Comment: March 26, 2012
Replies

Eileen
Posted: March 26, 2012
YEP...that's it !    I knew you'd like it....twittles and all !    I'm bettin you can handle all that too !    x-D

J. David
Posted: March 26, 2012
Eileen,
I found a decent recording of it here (always helps me to here it in the proper setting before I learn it), gotta love those twittles!
http://www.cranfordpub.com/mp3s/lisamacarthur1.mp3
I'll put it on the todo list.
Dave

Eileen
Posted: March 26, 2012
It's the same tune J....I think this one has a few more "twittles" in it.....




J. David
Posted: March 26, 2012

Eileen
Posted: March 26, 2012
Robyn, if you like that one you'll also like Dan Hughie MacEachern's March.  I have the music for that if you're interested.

You too J.   I'm on the wrong computer to scan a copy so when I get over to the other one I'll post it...not sure how to get it up on a pdf though...those pdf files are fantastic !
J. you did a fabulous job with Dunvegan, I bet you'd do just as well with Dan Hughie...I'd love to hear you play it !  :-)


J. David
Posted: March 25, 2012
Hi Robyn,
Its called the Braes of Dunvegan.
Here's a pdf of the notes.
http://cbsession.com/pdftunes/25.pdf

Robyn
Posted: March 25, 2012
That was really great J.D. !!! Nice triplets! I captured in Intonia just to have a go at it. What is the name of the tune? 

Jim Gross
Posted: March 25, 2012
J.David;
Wow that was terrific!  Your camcorder inset showing your left hand is a wonderful idea.  I was unable to watch both at the same time, but I just replayed it and watched the inset.  It was worth watching a second time just to hear the tune again.  Great work!

Eileen
Posted: March 25, 2012
J....that was very enjoyable !     :-)



J. David
Posted: March 25, 2012
"Left hand: Beth says there are two contact points: thumb and fingertips, but the side of my hand is also gently touching the neck. It will be a major re-engineering effort to get to the two contact points."

Scratch that analysis.  On "Left Hand Squeezing: part 5 - How Much Space, Really?", there is some elaboration on this point.  All is good in the world again!

Beth Blackerby
Posted: March 25, 2012
"the higher you climb, the steeper the hill"

Quote of the week. I totally agree with you! Very nice, J. David. I thoroughly enjoyed listening to you. My teacher, were he alive and listening, would have been able to tell that you were singing! You're right, you were rolling right along there with a nice flow. I think your sound is right on the money for a fiddling style. Classical tone production will make create a clearer, more precise tone quality, but then will sound "classical". There is a certain "roughness" that defines fiddling. I'm not sure what you'd like to sound like. If I were playing that song, I would just sound like a classical violinist playing a fiddle song.

Jason Eke
Posted: March 25, 2012
Very nice song.

J. David
Posted: March 25, 2012
Self Critique:
  • Intonation: Off in spots, I should have remembered to warm up with some scales first.
  • Right hand: fluid right hand wrist/finger movement is absent.  I can do the fluid wrist/fingers while practicing scales, but it seems to vanish whenever I play a tune.
  • Left hand: Beth says there are two contact points: thumb and fingertips, but the side of my hand is also gently touching the neck. It will be a major re-engineering effort to get to the two contact points.
  • Tone: Sounded passable under my ear while playing, but sounds kind of rough on the recording.  Maybe a bit less weight and a bit more bow speed would smooth it out?

Sometimes I think "the higher you climb, the steeper the hill".