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Beth Blackerby
You Facebookers will see this twice. 

I knew this on a physical level, but not an intellectual one: When we make a long slurred down bows from the G to the E string, crossing all strings, you gain bow length, specifically, the distance between two strings (times 3).  This holds true for an up bow, slurred on one stroke from the E to the G string. Oppositely, when you make a long slurred bow stroke on a down bow from the E to the G, you lose bow length in the same amount as you gain when going from the G to the E.  Sounds confusing? Try it, you'll see what I mean. I thought the "bow gaining" strokes were just more natural to the way our arms work in relation to the shape of the bridge. But it's also about bow conservation and distribution.
Beth Blackerby
5 Responses
Posted: February 29, 2012
Last Comment: March 1, 2012
Replies

Beth Blackerby
Posted: March 1, 2012
J. David. Yes. But even though you only gain an inch, when you play it feels exponential. A video is definitely in order. 


Posted: March 1, 2012
So, let's see if I've got this correct. If I place the hair of the bow on the E string right where the hair and the frog meet, and then rock the bow over to the G string,  there's some distance between where the hair meets the G string and where the hair meets the frog.  I think that's the distance we're talking about gaining/losing.  Looks to be about an inch.  Is that correct Beth?

Ian Renshaw
Posted: March 1, 2012
Waaah! I've tried it and I can't tell the difference! I need a video of you doing it Beth!
Ian :o)

Beth Blackerby
Posted: March 1, 2012
Place the bow at the tip on the G string and start an up bow slur, crossing the strings until you get to the E string. Each time you cross a string the bow is placed a little further towards the frog, so in essence you're running out of bow quicker. It's like climbing the stairs on an ascending escalator. 


Posted: February 29, 2012
Yes! Beth, you're right. But why should the distribution be less in the opposite direction? still trying to figure out. it's a puzzle.