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Posted: December 31, 1969

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Posted: February 15, 2012

Thank you Robyn and Dave for sharing your experiences when using "Intonia". Robyn, I like the way you describe things.

I believe I will have good use for this software with no problem related to Windows 7 which is occasional as Dave mentioned, and not all the time as I thought it was. My is Windows Vista and I have Java 6.0 with 26 updates according to my computerís records, but it does not indicate &/or I donít know where to look if it is 32-bit or 64-bit. This is something to be found out and correct if necessary.

Thank you again.

Patricia



Posted: February 15, 2012
Thanks Dave, 

That sounds very good for me. I was aware of the double stop issue, not really something I'll be practicing just yet!

I'm also trying to develop ear/finger coordination; I rely too much on my eyes and tapes on the neck, and I need to ween myself off that at some point. I like the sound of how you use it for practice, too, using it to check intonation after a tune but during a scale makes sense.

When I have the time, I'll download the trial version, and try it out. Then I'll try the opensource alternative once I've got the hang of Intonia.

Thanks again!


Posted: February 15, 2012
Hi Richard,
From a technical standpoint, I remember having some issues installing Intonia in a Windows 7 64-bit environment.  I had a 64-bit JRE (Java Runtime Environment) installed, and Intonia wanted a 32-bit one. It was easy enough to rectify just by downloading/installing the 32-bit JRE.

From a support standpoint, it has crashed on me a time or two but it's not a frequent occurrence. I've been using it since about 2008 and all of the updates have been free since my initial purchase.

From a usability standpoint, I haven't run into any serious snags. It doesn't track double stops well, I think it just picks the most dominant pitch.  But for me, that's not a serious limitation.

I usually use it when I begin to warm up with scales just to get proper sound of the scale in my head.  Then I'll look away from the screen and rely on my ear while playing and occasionally checking the screen if I think I've veered off.  I'm trying to develop ear/finger coordination rather than sight/finger coordination.

For a beginner, I think it's a great tool to get that "sound of the scale" in your head, almost like having a teacher to guide you on intonation whenever you practice.

The other thing that I think it's really good for is when I'm playing tunes. I don't watch it while I'm playing but it's great to be able to go back and look at the graph to see how your intonation was throughout the tune. It's also quite easy to see if there are any systemic intonation problems (for instance, I tend to wander a little flat sometimes without realizing it - Intonia will show you these types of things clearly).

Another application similar in concept to Intonia but open source (meaning absolutely free to use) is tartini.  The visual display isn't quite as intuitive/appealing as Intonia's but it's quite fun to play with (I'm still trying to figure out the vibrato mode).  Here's the URL  http://miracle.otago.ac.nz/postgrads/tartini/

Hope that helps,
Dave




Posted: February 15, 2012
HI Dave,

I'm also considering Intonia, but you're the only person so far who has described it as 'quite good', which suggests that you are aware of some limitations.

I'd imagine that for a beginner like me, the limitations would be acceptable for such a fairly priced piece of software, but what do you feel it is/isn't good at, for you?


Posted: February 15, 2012
Tricia, I've been using Intonia for a few years now and agree with Robyn that it's quite good at what it does.
Actually you can just download/install it , there's a free 30-day try out period.
Dave


Posted: February 15, 2012

I have Finale PrintNote and I'm happy with the easy way to enter the notes using the computer's keyboard. However, does not respond very well reading scanned scores as it is supposed to do, neither help me when using the microphone because you need a wind instrument.

For those reasons, I'm considering to purchase "Intonia" designed for violin and others string instruments. Does not write the music, but record the pitch while playing letting you know the name of the notes just played (and consequently, you realize how far you were from the note you meant to play. Hee, hee LOL!!), can be used in a computer (Windows) and the more I know and read about it, the more interested I become.

But I will like to know the opinion of others, because it is only $25.00 US dollars and when something sound too good to be true... well, we all know the answer.

Patricia



Posted: February 15, 2012
Musescore is an excellent substitute for finale, I have no idea why I didn't try it before... Thanks both of you!

As far as I know... (which is not very far, as I'm not really an 'apple mac person') the rhythm trainer app that Beth mentioned will work on an iPod touch 2nd gen, as long as it has the right firmware. I think... I'll check again... yes, I think thats what it says:)

Ta!



KarenJ
Posted: February 14, 2012

Richard, if you like Finale, you'll probably like Musescore.  and it's free.  they are both very similar.  i use them to rewrite some of my music because you can hear it play back.  ok its sounds like a computer, but you get the gist of it.  Hey Jack, maybe Musescore would be a good one. you input the rhythm and play it back. no other app required.



Posted: February 14, 2012
Had to go and buy an iPod... I think it will be worth it.

I've tried a piece of software called 'Finale Songwriter', which allows you to compose and also import sheet music in PDF form. Its great, but I couldn't afford it after the trial period ran out.

Beth Blackerby
Posted: February 14, 2012
I agree. 9.99 was hefty for an app, and I don't really like it, but I figured I just wasn't patient enough to work with it. 

KarenJ
Posted: February 13, 2012

I didn't see the Rhythm Timer either, but i did see a Rhythm Trainer where you can put in your own rhythm.


Eileen
Posted: February 13, 2012
Wow...that "IS" the coolest thing !  I just have to run right out and get myself an iphone now that I see a REAL reason to have one !    x-D

Beth Blackerby
Posted: February 13, 2012
Sorry Richard, it's an app. Apple store for that one. I wish they had these things for computer tho.


Posted: February 13, 2012
Hi Beth, I tried googling 'rhythm timer', but there wasn't any software of that name in the results. Do you remember anything else about it?

Thanks!

Richard

Beth Blackerby
Posted: February 13, 2012
No, but there is one that does! It's called Rhythm Timer. It's a little complicated to work with, but you can create your own patterns. If you buy it and try it, please share a review.