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The new videos "One Finger Scales, Parts 1, 2 and 3 (with arpeggios)" are great.

Also, is a very good way for me to get familiar with the fingerboard.

Thank you Beth.

Patricia


7 Responses
Posted: February 9, 2012
Last Comment: February 10, 2012
Replies

Eileen
Posted: February 10, 2012
I can hear whole step vs half step and know when the half steps are coming as well.  It's something that I don't really have to think about.....but.....if I'm not in 1st or 3rd I have no idea where I am so....that's not really saying much !  x-*

Hopefully these 1 finger scales will help fill in that gap.......

KarenJ
Posted: February 10, 2012

When you say you're thinking interval, do you mean wholestep/half step or do you think major/ minor/diminished etc.  My brain definitely doesn't work that fast. 

The fingerboard workbook really helped me learn alot about intervals, but its a slow thought process.


Beth Blackerby
Posted: February 10, 2012
Jim, I think you should wait on the one finger scales. I would advise you to build a strong foundation of regular 2-octave scales, getting your intonation good, and then start some basic shifting exercises (see the Shifting series) before starting on the one finger scales.

Robyn, knowing the position I'm in is immensely helpful for me. When I was making the video, I had to stop a few times because my intonation wasn't stellar, let's say. As soon as I thought position, all was well. Thinking interval is intuition for me. I can easily enough "hear" the spacing that comes next, so I can reserve mental energy for position. Now having said that, beyond 6th position I don't have a "feel" for position anymore. The distance between positions is so minuscule by that point, and the shape of that hand doesn't change much after 6th/7th. But 1-5th is crucial. If I'm not sure what position I'm shifting to, my hand can get out of whack for a second.



Eileen
Posted: February 10, 2012
I've been working through the "Introducing The Positions" book and these one finger scales will definitely be a great addition to that ! 

Patricia, I think you are right about the staying in one position so long and tendency to squeeze.  I've been playing too long mostly in 1st position and I too have a "squeezing" problem that has so hindered just about everything I've been trying to learn...most especially vibrato.   Using the harmonic pressure I think will help loosen up a great deal.

Thanks for the addition Beth !.....that poor little student, but I bet she benefited a great deal from your enthusiasm that day !  ;-)


Posted: February 9, 2012

Jim, I'm not a teacher and it is better to wait for Beth advise, but perhaps the reason why many people squeeze the fingerboard is because Suzuki keep you in first position and without vibrato until Volume 4; so, we are use to glue our left hand in the same place for 2 to 3 plus years. Vibrato has been very difficult for me to learn because I canít easily loose the hand while pressing the string.

Consequently, to start loosing and moving the left hand along the fingerboard from the beginning might be a good idea. At least, is not going to do any harm. But again, I'm not a teacher and these are my personal impression and conclusions.

Patricia


Jim Gross
Posted: February 9, 2012
I've been feeling like I might be ready to start Aunt Rhody, trying to get things right before moving on, getting a firm foundation and all that.  Would I want to add one finger scales to my practice?  I think so, but also think it best to ask...

Beth Blackerby
Posted: February 9, 2012
You're welcome! It's one of those things that gets totally neglected. And since it was fresh on my mind yesterday, I had my poor little Wednesday student doing one finger scales for half her lesson.