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KarenJ

 found a note that I've never seen before.  it looks like an eighth note, but the bubble is hollow like a half note.  If the first measure is in the sheetmusic, does it sound like or is it played like the second measure, or the third?  or am I way off?

 

KarenJ
12 Responses
Posted: February 8, 2012
Last Comment: February 9, 2012
Replies

Eileen
Posted: February 9, 2012
Lol...you see my music Patricia,  I have it all color coded with highlighters....all the repeats, codas, DSL codas....circles and arrows pointing me where to go next......etc etc....because when I'm trying to follow along I just don't see all those road signs...sometimes I miss them when they're bright PINK !  <:-(   That's actually pretty embarrassing to admit...lol.

Once we've played it a few times and I know where I"m going, then they switch it up on me and I have to add more arrows....  x-D   Keeps me on my toes !


Posted: February 9, 2012

I agree with you Eileen, particularly in today's world where the computer copy/paste make it so simple for everybody.

I personally have plenty already trying to follow all the marks written on the score: forte, piano, staccato, up stroke, accidental sharps, dotted notes, legato, harmonic, trill, shifting, fingering etc, etc, etc., and these are only in short simple pieces of music.

Mr. publisher, please don't invent more things.

Patricia


Eileen
Posted: February 9, 2012
Isn't there quite "enough" in sheet music to read that they have to go and do something like that ?  lol...why don't they just write it out like it is in that 3rd measure ??  <:-\


Posted: February 8, 2012

Oh yes, yes! Yes Anne, I believe you are in the right track, "repeat the eight notes for the duration of a half note". This rings a bell in my head that I heard the same explanation before on similar notations when there are many repetitions of the same set of notes. This morning I did not remember because it is not very common to find them in the pieces of music that I can play according to my level. Thank you.

Patricia


KarenJ
Posted: February 8, 2012

yes, there are 3 short pieces.  i'll get a little familiar with them then if i can figutre out the video thing, i'll post for a critique.  anyone know what an audition is like?  I know there will be sight reading but not sure what else.  should i know certain scales and arpeggios?  they don't mention them, but should i have some ready?


Anne aMaudPowellFan
Posted: February 8, 2012
I believe it is a shorthand notation and stands for repeated eights, hence the single bar, and the figure should be repeated for the duration of a half note, hence the half note open heads. So, the third version is correct.

Are there set pieces for auditioning? Why don't you let yourself be coached here and give it a try?

KarenJ
Posted: February 8, 2012

I don't remember, but i think it was 4/4


Jim Gross
Posted: February 8, 2012
I've never seen notation like that, but what I'm wondering is, is the piece in 3-4 or 4-4?
If 3-4 then maybe second measure, if 4-4 then maybe third measure...

KarenJ
Posted: February 8, 2012

This isn't the actual score.  I created this in Finale notepad then converted to jpeg to add the "holes"  the score was shaped in an oblong or oval fashion just like a half note, but they were the size of eighth notes and connected like it is shown here.  I'm sure it's not a harmonic. (well, pretty sure)



Posted: February 8, 2012

Oh boy! You wake-up my curiosity and this will be in my mind all day long.

I zoomed the view on my screen, and the two notes in question are very round, so as Beth mentioned, not the usual way to indicate harmonics. It does not looks like a printer's error or low in toner. (So far, we have ruled out two things). Beside, I count 3 beats on the first two measures and 4 beats on the third measure. Do you remember what was the time signature?

But Karen don't be scare because as soon as we found out how this notes are to be played, chances are that is a very simple thing.

Patricia


KarenJ
Posted: February 8, 2012

I was sitting in on a rehearsal of the local symphony.  I saw this in the sheetmusic.  i think it sounded like the third measure, but i wasn't sure if i was following correctly.  I was considering auditioning for second violin, but things like this scare me off.  I'll probably have a few questions about the audition pieces.  the first two seem pretty simple, but the third is questionable.  If i was able to get into this group, it would save me 40 miles of driving one way as compared to the current group i am in.  The difficulty level is higher though.  not sure I'm ready.


Beth Blackerby
Posted: February 8, 2012
That's very strange Karen. Hollowed notes like that would tend to indicate harmonics, but the note heads don't look like diamonds, nor are there zeros over the notes. My best guess is it should be played like the 3rd example (assuming it's in 4/4 meter).