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Simon
Hi Beth - just reviewing the Part 5 shifting video - ascending (high finger to low finger). In the video, you demonstrate shifting on the A string from second finger C natural to second finger E natural to then help place the first finger on D natural. My question is: if I were to shift from C# would my shift still be to E natural or to E# so that I'm still keeping a high second during the shift? Thanks.

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Simon
7 Responses
Posted: November 11, 2011
Last Comment: November 11, 2011
Replies

Eileen
Posted: November 11, 2011
X-D     it's a laughing face....  ;-)

Simon
Posted: November 11, 2011
Thanks Beth, yes that makes sense - when I was thinking about it I couldn't decide whether finger spacing was most important or the key signature, but you've cleared it up for me.

Thanks!


Patricia
Posted: November 11, 2011

He, He! I was just kidding. For some reason mentioning “F# Major” sound to me like Disney’s Mary Poppins “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious”

I’m already struggling with C# minor with only four sharps and in one octave.

Patricia

PS.- Eileen, what the X-D is in the chat’s language?


jojo
Posted: November 11, 2011
I like Gflat major ;) especially the 3 octave version hehehehehe

Eileen
Posted: November 11, 2011


X-D

Patricia
Posted: November 11, 2011

Mnn! F# Major with six sharps?

… if you say it loud enough, you’ll always sound precocious

even so the sound of it is something quite atrocious…

Um diddle diddle diddle, um diddle ay!….

Patricia


Beth Blackerby
Posted: November 11, 2011
Good question.  You would shift to the note that is in the key of the passage you are playing.  So if you're in A major the second finger would shift to an E.  If you're in F# major (heaven forbid), then the 2nd finger would map to the E#. So basically the sliding finger moves to it's place in the context of the key you're in, to keep the whole hand, and in turn the finger patterns aligned to the key. Make sense?