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tomi
Hi!

Now that we've got my doublestopped fifths problem sorted out...sort of...I've got another technical question:

I have 3 octave G major scale on my list at the moment, and there is one spot that is not quite clear. This version of G maj goes so that 1st shift is on A string to D in 3rd position and 2nd shift on E string to D in 6th position.

Now, I hit D with 1st finger, E with 2nd and F# with 3rd. Pinky is supposed to get final G, but even though I don't have big fingers, no matter how I squeeze it there next to 3rd, G will be sharp.

So the question is: What is the correct way to maneuver with fingers up there if they don't fit like in lower positions? Should I slide lower finger(s) down or lift it/them out of the way?


tomi
13 Responses
Posted: November 7, 2011
Last Comment: November 9, 2011
Replies

Anne aMaudPowellFan
Posted: November 9, 2011
Sorry for making a public hash out of the convolutions of my ABRSM exam. They are of course of minor importance in this forum. But since I've opened this can of worms, here are the bare facts: They told me "3.4.12" as date for the exam, I read this to mean 3 April 2012, but they meant 3 or 4 Dezember 2011.

I appreciate all your support and good wishes.

Anne aMaudPowellFan
Posted: November 8, 2011
Yes, 4 December 2011, Jo. That's the point. Pretty soon. Four months sooner than I reckoned with. And not much leeway for practicing since work is busy too.

My husband is thinking along the same lines as you, Ray, in German it is even breaking neck and legs. Horrible if you think of it.

Anyway, I greatly appreciate all your good wishes!



Ray
Posted: November 8, 2011


Best of luck Ann!  Actors say 'Break a leg' what do violinists say?  'Break a string' 'Keep your chin rest up' 'Here's a straight bow to you'  Any way you get the idea.  You have a huge cheering crowd behind you in the wings of the stage.  I've toyed with the idea of taking the grades here in Canada.  Maybe.  But not for awhile.  A long while.

Best,

Ray


jojo
Posted: November 8, 2011
oh so not december the 4th 2011??

Anne aMaudPowellFan
Posted: November 8, 2011
Thank you, Jo. I appreciate it. And I am looking forward to record a test run for you all to review soon.

They really fooled me with the date, first e-mailing 3.4.12, which I read as third of April 2012, and last week I got a letter saying December 4th. Going back to the e-mail, I now realize they meant December 3rd or 4th 2012.

So now I still hope to do well on my pieces but will be grateful if I get a pass on all the ear training stuff.

And sorry, Patricia, the deal is about G minor melodic, of course.

jojo
Posted: November 8, 2011
December the 4th IS IN MY DIARY ANNE!!!!

I AM HERE FOR YOU...YOU'LL HEAR ME SUPPORTING YOU ALL THE WAY FROM LONDON UK ANNE!!! :) :) :) x

Anne aMaudPowellFan
Posted: November 8, 2011
Thank you, Patricia, for your vote of confidence. And we have a deal about 3 octave harmonic minors in January!

Patricia
Posted: November 8, 2011

...  I swear when this is behind me I will volunteer for Flesch or Galamian, A-Z.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Anne:

First of all, I have the feeling you are going to do fine in your exam. In addition, I wish you the best of good luck.

Second, since Beth is doing already a great job with Harmonic minors, I’m going to take your words mentioned on the first line above (which sound like music to my ears) and I will be looking for your help with Galamian Melodic minor’s 3-octave fingering in January of 2012.

A promise is a promise for most of the people, but I like better when a promise is a “debt” lol! Thanks.

Patricia


Anne aMaudPowellFan
Posted: November 8, 2011
Love your terminology, Beth: "up scoot", indeed.

I played scales yesterday in my lesson, and what annoys me no end that for the harmonic minor teacher wants a different fingering than for the major, because of the half step between degrees 8 and 7 when going down. So it is 4 3 2 4 3 2 1 on the E string going down from G. It makes sense, of course.

We really should have done scales more systematically a long time ago, like Jo does. Now I have to have all kinds of scales ready by December 4 for my ABRSM exam, by heart, and fingerings are still not stable. I swear when this is behind me I will volunteer for Flesch or Galamian, A-Z.

Beth Blackerby
Posted: November 7, 2011
Tomi, Even my fingers are too big to snuggle the half step and play it accurately. When I get to that 4th finger, the 3rd finger has to get out of the way. It indeed may be the reason, thank you Anne, for the 4-4 fingering. However, I'm not a big fan of the 4-4 pinky scoot. In practical application, it isn't as clean sounding as using consecutive fingers, so in the context of a scalar melodic passage with that 1/2 step, I would not use 3-4, instead of 4-4 so that the delineation of the notes are more clear. In fact, this is one of the motivating reasons behind making the scale rounds. I wanted to offer as many "real life" fingering options as I could within one key. The goal is that after you've played the scales using different fingering combinations, you are versatile and won't be stuck knowing only one fingering system.

Anne aMaudPowellFan
Posted: November 7, 2011
Jo, I tend to lift second and third finger for the last few notes on the E string. Perhaps it is psychological but the sound is more fee that way, less cramped. My teacher has never commented on that. But don't any of you listen to me. I don't want to lure anybody into bad habits!

I also play three-octave scales with long note values and vibrato, and then I lift all fingers except the one that plays the note.

jojo
Posted: November 7, 2011
Anne...sorry...not sure what you are talking about keeping first finger anchored on the last bit of G major 3 octave? I wouldn't have thought you need to? as you would be playing 5th position C (1st finger)-D (2nd finger)-E (3rd finger)-Fsharp (with 4th finger) then 4th finger extension for G?? so you can keep all your fingers down in this case as they are all a tone spaced out LOL :) (except for Fsharp-G but for that you do 4th finger then slide 4th finger for an extension).

Have I got that right??

But maybe you were saying that 'just' for the scales ending up higher?

Funny enough, I do keep my fingers down pretty much all the way up, even with an Fsharp 3 octave scale (yikes!) though I still play this type of 'dizzy height' scale still separate bows and 'slow' for correct intonation...

ps I never do a 4-4-4, that's interesting, but I do do a 4-4 :)

Anne aMaudPowellFan
Posted: November 7, 2011
Hi Tomi, in high positions you can't use block fingerings; that is, lift fingers 2 and 3. I keep the first finger down for anchoring, so I don't loose the sense of the position.

I also use a different fingering on the E string: I play A B (1 2) in third position and then move into fifth position with finger 1 on C. Then I play F# and G and F# again all with finger 4, who moves up and down just a tiny bit for the half step up there, keeping my first finger anchored on the E. Indeed, all my three-octaves scales end in this 4-4-4 finger pattern. Now that you mention it, it is probably for just the reason you mention that it is difficult to play a half step with fingers 3 and 4 high up on the fingerboard.