Community
You must be a member to respond to discussions.
Discussion

Elke Meier
If you get tired of Josephine Trott's exercises: I chanced upon the most beautiful double stop exercise today! Actually, I have heard this many times, but it was only today that I noticed: oh, this is actually PURE double stops! And so unbelievably beautiful! 
I am talking about the Adagio from Bach's Sonata No 5 (BWV 1018). Try it!
Elke Meier
15 Responses
Posted: July 8, 2019
Last Comment: July 17, 2019
Replies

Maria
Posted: July 17, 2019


Thank you Elke for sharing this...Will try how the fingering works and how complicated is this on my next day off...

Right now my left index finger is painful most likely arthritis, so I'm gorging on fresh cherries and tomorrow I will pound some young leaves of mugwort, fresh ginger and virgin coconut oil and apply it on that painful joint.

Elke Meier
Posted: July 17, 2019
Just for your information: I corrected the files according to Beth's instructions and uploaded the new versions of the PDF file and the Musescore source file in the Resources' bowline section. It is way more shifting, so will need more practice, but it is much easier on the fingers this way! Thank you, Beth!


Timothy Smith
Posted: July 16, 2019
Thank you Elke. 

This is very helpful since there is SO much material out there for everything. Really too much to make a rational decision about what is best. It's easy to buy books. If only owning a book would make us better. I find I need more focus or I'm wading around in a sea of books and educational materials.

Elke Meier
Posted: July 16, 2019
Tim, I would at least start with Josephine Trott before attempting Bach double stops. Josephine Trott has loosened my hand to where I even can start the other one. And I would NOT consider her pieces NOT music. They are really nice! Other nice pieces are Martha Yasuda's books - hymns, folklore, etc. and QUITE a bit easier than the Bach... 

Timothy Smith
Posted: July 16, 2019
As I'm just now breaking into DS I am not enthused about Josephine Trott's book from reading this :)

Elke thanks for sharing this. As a beginner at it I feel like I'm either nuts or a glutton for punishment to even try this:)  I know it gets easier as we go. I made it through the first several measures last night but I was dragging as we say...tired. Maybe a rested me will think differently.

I do much prefer something that at least feels like music I can play later on. I need to get better though. In hell they will say which would you rather have, nails on a chalk board or Tim's double stops?

Elke Meier
Posted: July 15, 2019
Thank you so much, Beth! This makes a lot of sense - and is a relief! The tritone between 3 and 4 just about killed me. I had hoped that the tenseness in the hand in this situation would get better in time. After all in the beginning EVERY double stop is tense and you wonder how people manage to change two fingers at once. But after a while you realize that it is possible. So, in this certain situation I had hoped that it would be a similar experience all over again. But I sure won't miss it if I don't have to develop looseness in my hand for a 3-4-tritone... 

Beth Blackerby
Posted: July 15, 2019
This discussion includes members-only video content

Elke, I made a few changes to your copy according to how I would do it :)

Elke Meier
Posted: July 15, 2019
Yes, the second line with the mini notes is the bowline. But in this I found the bow line not too important - there is very little change :). Still I put it in because this is where I mark the up and down bows. 
The letters between the lines indicate the interval of the DS. That, together with the Kinesthetic Intonation Chart I mentioned below helps me to know where to put the fingers. 
I have no clue, what level this piece is, Maria! I just thought that it would be a nice break to all the DS pieces by Josephine Trott :). When I started working on it I noticed that it is quite a challenge for my level (Suzuki 3). But I like it so much that I still keep at it. And I think I will be able to do it, since it is so slow. There is a LOT to learn on the way...  

Maria
Posted: July 15, 2019
4am

Hi Elke,

What are those mini notes/lines at the bottom? Is that the bow line you were mentioning?

This piece is quite hard, it has 3 flats plus DS, what level is this?

Elke Meier
Posted: July 15, 2019
I just posted the bowline version I mentioned below in the Resources. However, I felt very much out of my comfort zone in preparing this. Beth, if you see this, would you please have a look at it and tell me what you think? Does it make sense? Should something like this have more shifts? I only added shifts in the places where I felt my fingers would probably break off if I didn't shift, or like when the fourth finger should cover the G and D-strings for a perfect fifth - I just could not see that poor fellow managing that! In the bowings I tried to follow Frank Peter Zimmermann, at least as far as I could see it in the video. But I am very insecure about the last few measures. Are they even doable like this?

This is such a beautiful piece! But I am realizing that it is quite a bit more challenging than these early pieces of Josephine Trott that I am normally practicing... Nevertheless I find it very rewarding to work on it. The first third I can do - but it looks to me like that is the easier part :). 

The bowings by Zimmermann need a very light and relaxed bow to be able to do the tapers and the soft but still clear beginnings of the note. That is a real good exercise as I tend to crash into the note with a very pronounced "K"-sound, especially if it is a double stop... 

Maria
Posted: July 9, 2019


Thank you much Elke for the link...


Actually I have 4, 3 copies of book 1 and 1 copy of book2...

Book1 no. 1, lost it...My teacher ordered me another copy [book copy no.2], lost it again...Teacher then ordered me 3rd copy of book 1 and a copy of book  ll...I can't find both! lol... 
Next time my teacher perhaps would suggest she will keep it! lol [must be my brain panicking and completely erased my memory where I kept these books! Brains works in mysterious ways...]

Elke Meier
Posted: July 9, 2019
I started to make a bowline version for this last night. Doing it I realized that the bowline is not so much a problem here - there is very little bow change (I like Zimmermann's bowing pattern more than the one written in the music and will try to copy his). What the real challenge is is the different intervals and to play them cleanly. So I have also marked all the intervals. That way I can look them up in the Kinesthetic Intonation Chart. Otherwise I don't think I can manage all these chromatic changes cleanly. Right now I am working on the fingering. Once that is in I will share it on the bowline page. 

The first few times I played it through veeery, very slowly without this, but soon noticed that consistency and clean playing are a challenge if I don't understand the music theory behind it and if I don't have an image in my mind of where which finger has to go when.

Dianne
Posted: July 8, 2019
Oooh I like this. Thank you.

Elke Meier
Posted: July 8, 2019
I can understand that you don't find the third M Trott book, Maria - as far as I know there are only two... And my two volumes are actually in one single book :)

Here are a few links to the Adagio:
Szeryng - I really, really like this
Grumiaux - not bad either ...

Here is a link to the sheet music: Adagio - the Adagio starts on page 33 of the PDF file.

Happy practicing :)



Maria
Posted: July 8, 2019


Any link Elke? Thank you...

Excited to see it first, DS is my nemesis...

I have 3 books of Mrs T, but can't find them!