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Dianne
Beth and VLab members, I am using the Barbara Barber scale book right now as it seems to be what I need at the moment for clarity, but can you suggest a double stop scale routine that I can fit into a daily practice schedule? So far I have only done the 1 octave GM in 3rds using the tutorial on that. I guess I am feeling a bit overwhelmed with not wanting to take on unnecessary things, but wanting to incorporate a sensible yet broad enough double stop scale routine going forward that will develop my skills, so a practice plan. ANY guideline on this will be greatly appreciated! I am once again without teacher and wanting to have a compressed but helpful DS scale routine (what scales, what intervals, what octaves/positions?).
Dianne
8 Responses
Posted: July 3, 2019
Last Comment: July 5, 2019
Replies

Dianne
Posted: July 5, 2019
Thank you, Sonia! There is next to nothing about the Diminished and  Dominant 7ths on my searches online, as if you need to be with a teacher to understand them, and no explanations theory wise in the scales books that I can find, so your help is sooo appreciated. I feel ready to set off in scales now!! Here I come!

Sonia Lancaster
Posted: July 5, 2019
Sorry Dianne, you are correct in that diminished and dominants are arpeggios. I was writing the last response while bouncing around in a car (not driving lol). 

The explanation of them I worked out was Diminished 7th: is Root plus 2 minor 3rds and a Dim 7th (equivalent to maj 6th)
Dom 7th is root, maj 3rd, perfect 5th and minor 7th.

Not sure it helps, just what is written in my book


Dianne
Posted: July 5, 2019
Dominant & Diminished Scales
Thank you Sonia. I forgot about the Dominant & Diminished Scales. The terminology for these is a little confusing for me. This site describes a Diminished Scale as also a chord, and that practicing arpeggios will help with the Diminished Scale. Confusing terminology for me at this point between scale=chord versus arpeggio. My Barbara Barber condensed scale book has two pages of G Scale exercises, with the Dominant & Diminished in what looks like an arpeggio section.

This is diverging from discussion of double stop scales, but can anyone lend a hand for understanding Dominant & Diminished scale terminology? Thanks!

Sonia Lancaster
Posted: July 5, 2019
Hi Dianne,
Glad you found the information useful. Each grade has a selection of scales, arpeggios and technical work. Not every exam has all keys, this would be just too much to do. Scales are generally major, minor (harmonic and melodic), dominant and diminished 7th, chromatic, Double Stops, Single String scales and harmonics. Arpeggios are similar. There is also a variety of bowing, so lots to think about.

Yes, you can only get the syllabus by purchasing it. If you need more info you could send me an email. My email address is on the contacts page.

Have fun!
Sonia

Dianne
Posted: July 4, 2019
I found the next set you mention in this AMEB Grade 6 exam video. This is great so that I can now see how they are done. Thank you for setting me on the right path. Without a syllabus, I was lost on how to approach the vast area of all major and minor scales with these in a single practice session each day. This gives me ones to focus on. And I can follow these videos! I think I'm all set now!

Dianne
Posted: July 4, 2019
Thank you Sonia. I have done the 5ths and the open string DS already. I was able to find one video on AMEB Grade 5 DS and it has the 1st group that you mention in it so I can see how they are done! Are these the only ones that the student practices for the Grade 5 exam or do they prepare all major and minor this way and get tested on just these since it would be time consuming to do all keys this way. I guess that is what I wonder about, how much should I do, just a few keys as these you mention, and then would move through the keys at the next Grade and so on. Yes, it would be great if you could share with me what is done for each grade ((if you had time) because I don't seem to be able to see the AMEB syllabus without purchasing it or having a login. Thank you for what you have given me, it is a great start!

Sonia Lancaster
Posted: July 4, 2019
Hi Dianne
I guess there are many ways to practice them and depending on how proficient you are, perhaps start with DS exercises than scales? Open string 5ths help with bow level/distribution and open string played with a fingered note eg a sixth. I think 6ths are easier than 3rds because of how the lower finger shifts across to the next higher string when moving up the scale. Fingered Octaves are great for hand shape. 4ths good for precise intonation.

Playing the scales broken is easier as well. Looking in my technique book for AMEB exams the first scales are A major one octave, in 3rds and 6ths, broken, followed by Bb major one octave, 6ths and octave, broken.

After that itís C major in 3rds - 2 octaves, and played in octaves - 1 octave. D major one octave, sixths and octaves.

Hope this makes sense. I can go further through the book if youíre interested.

Sonia

Dianne
Posted: July 4, 2019
Different Resources Have Different Double Stops
I see that one orchestra player plays 3rds and octaves in their scale routine for maintenance, but they have obviously played all of the intervals already, whereas I am covering them as a student. The Simon Fischer DS Scale book contains thirds, sixths, octaves, fingered octaves and tenths for all major and minor scales. Sevcik OP. 9 contains seconds, thirds, fourths, sixths, octaves and tenths. This starts to sound like an open ended question, yet one that is practical to ask I think, so I can get started with a practice plan. So, to avoid practicing 6-8hours/day, and having already practiced some 6ths in Whistler a while back, I need to figure out what at a minimum I should practice, or else the big picture that can be spread over time that is covered in someone's studio. Tenths are obviously out as I will not need them in any repertoire I play. :) My guess would be to follow the Fischer rather than the Sevcik. And Whistler Double Stops, which I stopped using, is a good reference for which should should be played first(sixths before thirds etc.) But can I just play thirds and be in good shape for now?