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Ray
Hi Beth,

So THAT is why you composed the string crossing exercises 1-4.  I practicing (mindfully) on Exercise #3 when that thought came to me. 

You want us to feel comfortable, no comfortable is the wrong word.  You want us to unconsciously or by reflex be able to pivot and move freely on all three sides of all four strings.  So that when we arrive at the note just before the string change we are able to automatically angle the bow to just a fraction of a  millimeter away from the new string.  Then be able to transfer the same bow weight, speed, and placement from the old string to the new string. 

Do I have that right?
Ray
3 Responses
Posted: October 5, 2018
Last Comment: October 6, 2018
Replies

Ray
Posted: October 6, 2018
To keep myself honest with the length of time, for the double stops, I play the string crossing exercises to a metronome.  Right now I am playing the double stops for a quarter of the bow at 72 bpm and every click represents a quarter of the bow.  This afternoon I will have the metronome click on the eighth and therefore play the double stop for the last eighth note value.

Eventually, I would like to work up to 120 bpm.  This, I feel, is an achievable goal.

Beth Blackerby
Posted: October 5, 2018
You got it, Ray!

Ray
Posted: October 5, 2018
So besides moving the right elbow, wrist, flexible right hand fingers, there is also the pivoting of the bow in relation from the current string towards the new string.  And when we practice specifically the string crossings of a piece of music that we will be performing we need to not only know from which string to which string but also at what part of the bow we will be at and whether it is a down or up bow.  That way our practice time will be more focused.