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Beth Blackerby
I added a few more videos on the Resources Vibrato Page!
Beth Blackerby
22 Responses
Posted: August 1, 2018
Last Comment: August 11, 2018
Replies

Alan Barnicoat
Posted: August 11, 2018
Hi Susan,

I also noticed right away that my right hand becomes active - not flinging so much but just  fingers gradually becoming tense and curling claw-like. I discovered however, that If I just let my right arm hang straight down from my shoulder it becomes easy to monitor both the flinging left hand while maintaining a relaxed right hand.

Susan Hollister
Posted: August 11, 2018
I am posting my progress on the vibrato exercises for the week.

I practiced them for about 10 minutes, 3x a day since Monday. I could do exercises 1-4 at 150 very comfortably and exercises 5 and 6 at 100 and 110 very comfortably, and I started them at 120.

I also started from the beginning of the exercises in the 1st position. One problem I had was that my right hand also wanted to fling back and forth, so I had  to really concentrate to keep it still. (Another good reason to practice without the bow at first!)

By tonight I can do exercises 1-4 at 150 in the first position. I started practicing exercises 1-4 with each finger on each string at 100 and 110 I can also do exercises 5 and 6 at 100 in the 1st position, so I am practicing those exercises on each finger too. 

Although I am not using the noodle (just haven't bought one yet), that video was very helpful to watch especially because of the detailed description of what the thumb and thumb joint is supposed to be doing.

I am so thankful to be making headway. Thank you, again, Beth! I am content to go slow. It is exciting to me to see the goal of having a vibrato within reach. It may take a while to get there, but I'm with you, Elke! Persevere! 





Dianne
Posted: August 10, 2018
Hi Alan, I felt it in my bicep. I also left the noodle on for a 1st position piece I was playing- it didn't seem to hinder anything, and I agree it made improvements- for me it made everything feel more comfortable, probably because it was forming my wrist position to the correct angle and stopped it from having any unintended changes.

I think you were wise by starting over from the beginning video when using the noodle. I stayed at video #6 and shouldn't have- I need to go back to the 1st video and work my way up again. My bicep can't take #6 yet!

Alan Barnicoat
Posted: August 9, 2018
First Time Noodling
Just tried sliding 3rd finger with the noodle bumper. Felt odd at first but kept going and did first lesson at 100% thru 150% in about 15 minutes. At first I was surprised at how weary my forearm felt but as I progressed to the faster tempos the fatigue disappeared.  I decided to keep the bumper on and tried playing one of the early Bach minuets with the bow. Intonation was much better with the bumper as it prevented my left hand from creeping up the neck. Maybe I should just keep it on for awhile. 

Beth Blackerby
Posted: August 9, 2018
Yay, Dianne!  I'm so glad it works for you. I will tell Laurie Scott, my friend who came up with the idea.

 It has everything to do with the swing of the hand. As I mention in the video, often when people move to 1st position,  the hand starts grabbing a bit, then the wrist and elbow start doing some strange thing and then hand doesn't really move anymore.



Dianne
Posted: August 9, 2018
It's working
Beth, I'm not sure what I was doing before, but it was definitely not a vibrato. Using the bumper in 1st position, I right away noticed I was using different muscles. I was also able to do a 1st finger vibrato.

Beth Blackerby
Posted: August 8, 2018
Hi Edgar, glad you like the videos! So far the finger is sliding. I'm including the sliding sounds on the videos so that you can try and get that same slidy sound. Also, I will give instructions in the talking videos to let you know how to proceed.

Edgar N
Posted: August 8, 2018
Hi Beth,
The videos on vibrato are great. My vibrato tends to use a combo of finger/wrist and some arm.
It would be great to see one of the videos showing what the finger is doing. Is it sliding, or lifting?

Edgar 

Dianne
Posted: August 8, 2018
Noodle Bumper
I'm making the noodle bumper now...

So excited to have videos to work with this in first position.

Dianne
Posted: August 5, 2018
I just started these today. I've been so busy but I looked forward to this. Since I already have a beginning vibrato, I didn't know where I fit in, so I went through them one by one and I ended up at #6. (If I was just starting, I would stay on the 1st video for a few weeks and then the next for a few weeks and so on.) Yes indeed, it is helping with my counting skills in order to be able to stay in rhythm. I'm going to commit to doing these a few times a day and follow along with all videos and instructions. I still have a forearm movement that comes and goes while putting some finger pressure, so this is exactly what I need- no finger pressure at this time, and for a few weeks until you get to that point. Thank you so much for these really cool videos on vibrato!

Barb Wimmer
Posted: August 4, 2018
3rd position is easier for vibrato, thanks for doing this, I am learning and have lots to learn on vibrato, but it is getting smoother

Beth Blackerby
Posted: August 4, 2018
Yay, Susan and Assumpció! This is so encouraging.  

I added the Swimming Pool Noodle video for you to prepare for the transition to 1st position. My experience has been that when people move from 3rd to 1st, the hand starts anchoring again against the neck. The noodle will create a new bumper to isolate the hand movements and hopefully will then make 1st position vibrato more natural For those of you already well into using vibrato, it might not be necessary.

I'll be making the next group of videos with the noodle. Then back up to position for the journey of adding finger pressure - 

- Then we'll add the bow

- Then we'll be focusing the pitch

- Then Voilá

Assumpció Segura
Posted: August 4, 2018
Hi Susan!

Totally agree.
I also practice these exercises every day on all the strings, with all the fingers and in third, second and first position.

They have helped me in the changes because I practice these exercises with an almost non-existent finger pressure on the string (the string and finger almost do not touch the fingerboard) and the hand and arm relax so much that the movement is increasingly controlled and relaxed and like a motor.

Then, later, I can make the position change much more easily because the hand does not squeeze anything.
I also started to change position with one finger (with all fingers) following Beth's exercises, but you only have to do this when the movement of the vibrato is perfectly regular and the relaxation of the hand and arm is total.

All these exercises 90% of the time without bow, only with the violin ..
I am very happy with the results I am getting, thanks to all the resources of Beth!
I think it's very important that we all share our experiences ... :)

Susan Hollister
Posted: August 4, 2018
Great! Thank you, Beth! I was really stuck on how to develop a vibrato, and these exercises are just what I need. I do practice them several times a day. Now I can do the first 3 exercises at 150 and the 4th, and 5th exercises I can do at 100 and 110. 

Benefits I have experienced so far are
1. a stronger wrist
2. more 'looseness' in the motion
3. a quicker motion
4. a more even and steady motion
5. more comfortability in the motion
6. more confidence that I can do this!!!!

Thank you!

I have started to practice vibrato they way you have descried in other videos (pick out a long note on a piece and extend that note as you practice vibrato)  and  it is improving! 

The music that is included is also very good for these exercises. The melodies are pleasant and listening to them over and over and over is enjoyable. 

Should we do these exercises in the first position, too?
Should we isolate each finger on every string? 

Asumpcio, I am wondering how do these exercises help with your shifting?






Beth Blackerby
Posted: August 3, 2018
Alan, probably not that fast for these. Since you're still sliding, the motion is bigger and 150% will be too fast. Once we start narrowing the motion by adding finger pressure, you'll be able to get it faster.

Fabiano Formiga de Carvalho
Posted: August 3, 2018
A great job of your webdesigner.

Alan Barnicoat
Posted: August 2, 2018
Can I assume we should work our way up from 100 to 150 percent with exercises 5 & 6 as well ? (...gasp!)

Assumpció Segura
Posted: August 2, 2018
Thank you very much Beth for these new vibrato resources!
I practice them almost every day and my vibrato and relaxation of the left hand is improving a lot.
The shiftigs have also improved.

I want to use them every day during the holidays and see the result in September.
I'm doing them on all the strings, with all the fingers and at different speeds.
I'm on vacation, but I really like to study the violin with all your resources and videos ... I'm making great progress! ...

Thank you very much!
Happy Holidays!


Claudio - São Paulo, Brazil
Posted: August 2, 2018
Thank you!

Alan Barnicoat
Posted: August 2, 2018
Another by product is that these exercises clearly inform me how tense my right hand and left shoulder become when the only "engagement" should be in my left wrist - this is really very helpful as a signal to relax and avoid self-imposed painful stress that creeps up on me. 

Beth Blackerby
Posted: August 2, 2018
Good to know, Jaime. I'll check the volume on that one.


 I will admit I have a hidden agenda with these videos. In addition to learning vibrato, I'm hoping as a by product, people's rhythmic reading skills and internal subdivision of the pulse improves!!

Jaime - Orlando , Fl
Posted: August 1, 2018
Beautifully done! 
I still have the problem of following the notes, but LISTENING to the music and following the VIDEO with your hand motion really makes it so much spot on and in rhythm. For exercise 6 had to pump up the volume to really appreciate the background beat, otherwise easy to follow! :0)
Excellent as always!
 Thank you!