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Mary Freeman
This discussion includes members-only video content

Here it is again
Bach Bourree
I am using this to clean up my playing 
Any suggestions about cleaner string crossing is most welcome
(I will leave this video here ;-) promise
Mary Freeman
22 Responses
Posted: July 1, 2018
Last Comment: July 14, 2018
Replies

Frieda
Posted: July 14, 2018
Not easy this one and what an improvement, so much cleaner already!

Elke Meier
Posted: July 14, 2018
That is an interesting link, Kurosh. When I compared it with Mary's second recording, I don't think speed is the issue. The eighth notes seem quite the right tempo. But what jumped to my attention was the slight hesitation at the beginning of the double stops. Imagining this as a dance puts an extra challenge to the double stops as they should come without hesitation and exactly on the first beat... 

Haha, Mary, I am sure glad I am just in the first piece of Suzuki 3. This sounds like a REAL challenge... Happy practicing! 

For the double stops separating the left and right hands for practice seems especially important. Like what Beth talks about in video #6 and I think it was #45 where it is about getting all needed fingers of the left hand in the right position instantly.

kurosh
Posted: July 14, 2018
Hi Mary,

Thank you for posting this favourite of mine!
Enjoyed listening to your recording but I would like to refer you this link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bourrée 
where you can listen to a sample of the appropriate rhythm of this dance of French origin.
I think your performance of it is too rushed and not easy to dance to. It needs to be more relaxed and rhythmic.
Regards, kurosh

Barbara Habel
Posted: July 12, 2018
Dear Mary

Now that is an astonishing improvement within such a short time frame.

If I was you I would still practice it again much slower and than work back up to the speed of the second video.

But the improvement is incredible.

Elke Meier
Posted: July 12, 2018
Wow, Mary, I just watched the original and your new version side by side! What a difference! This is really coming along nicely!

Dianne
Posted: July 12, 2018
Hi Mary, I could see improvement in your string crossings. Thanks for posting your progress on this.

Mary Freeman
Posted: July 11, 2018
This discussion includes members-only video content

Thank you so much for all of the help
Barbara The video you sent is awesome I have watched it 3 times already
I slowed my practice way down and then brought it back to a moderate speed that helped a lot. I do have a bow line for this but am still not comfortable using long bows yet. Jerry I was moved when you said you were inspired, Yay. It sound a bit smoother to me but I am still banging other strings in a few areas. Stephen I just finished watching Beth's video about using only the right hand when I saw your post. It is the next thing I am going to try.
Thanks again everyone soo much for the help;-)

Stephen, Los Osos, CA
Posted: July 8, 2018
Forget fingering & concentrate on the Bow.
Hi Mary,

Very nice!

When I have a piece with more difficult string crossings I do this,

String crossings are a right hand bow problem, so practice your phrases
without your left hand fingering. i.e. Play open strings on each string change
to the rhythm of the piece.  Your mind will connect quicker to the bow changes.
It also cements which notes are up and down and results in better preparation.  

My teacher taught me this awhile ago and it is very effective in improving
string crossings, best method I have found so far. 

Jerry Wright
Posted: July 5, 2018
Mary, excellent job.  I am working on this piece too and I find it very challenging to play.  I cannot play it at your pace yet, I've had to slow it down to around 90 - 94 bmp (even slower in spots] and even then I cannot play it all the way through without screwing it up. I am encouraged by your playing, keep up the great work.

Janice Branley
Posted: July 3, 2018
You did well with that, it is quite challenging and I think it's a bit of a pinkie buster!  I agree that if you slowed a little you could put a more weight into the string.  I still haven't tackled chords and find them a bit of a mystery......well done!

Barb Wimmer
Posted: July 3, 2018
Mary wanted to add I like how you play the triple strings together evenly. I am amazed how I can hit three strings when I don’t want to but im working on getting those chords more precise even

Jaime - Orlando , Fl
Posted: July 2, 2018
Thanks Elke! I purchased the note reading course, but not the practice course.... yet! ;0)

Elke Meier
Posted: July 2, 2018
Jaime, the bow line is explained starting with video #7 in the practice course. I don't know whether you already got the practice course. If you haven't, please do. Apart from joining VL in general this was the most helpful purchase I have done for my violin learning. The amount of helpful hints and tips in there is just unbelievable.

Jaime - Orlando , Fl
Posted: July 1, 2018
Mary, that was fantastic! I always enjoy your performances! This particular piece seems to have a lot of quick string crossings, so I guess practicing like Beth mentioned, at a comfortable pace. Intriguing how she introduces the concept of  "bow line"... I'm not sure what that is...

But you did a wonderful job! :0)

Maria
Posted: July 1, 2018
Great practice Mary, I remember this piece and I  was struggling big time years back and after listening to your video I tried to sing it but until now my version is still in adagio. I tried to sing it faster but I could not.

I admire those who can play fast pieces...

Looking forward to your next post. Have a lovely Sunday!

Barb Wimmer
Posted: July 1, 2018
Sounds great rhythm great   Good tone. That is a fun song.  I sometimes feel I have more control of my bow when I keep it closer to the bridge most of the time. That may be good or bad. You seem to have bow close to bridge and few times not but you may be doing it right there. I am new to learning bowing so like all say Beth’s practice videos are helpful. I would say maybe slow down a little on a phrase but I find that hard to do but it gives me control of bowing more. I would prioritize Beth’s videos on bow control as I am starting to see am still new at but how I may not have to always be at the bridge maybe for control

Dianne
Posted: July 1, 2018
Hi Mary, very nice! I couldn't see your right elbow and hand, but I think I saw you playing in the upper 3rd of the bow at times during fast string crossings. You could try moving down a bit and see if that helps. It might make it easier to move toward the middle 3rd of the bow (hand at the square) for fast string crossings. There are times to be at the upper 3rd also in this piece, this is just an idea. 

Elke Meier
Posted: July 1, 2018
There is no document available yet in the Resources section for this with the filled in bow line, but there is one with an empty bow line to fill in yourself.

Beth Blackerby
Posted: July 1, 2018
Mary, do you have a bow line for this? While I hear some improvement with your passage work, I still hear places where the finger action and the bow changes aren't aligning, as well as string crossing issues. Going back and forth between the bow line and the original part, at a slow tempo will help a lot. You may be doing that already, but if not, I recommend lots of that kind of practice.

Elke Meier
Posted: July 1, 2018
Mary, I am just now going through all the videos of the practice course. I can't follow everything at once, but I want to get an overview of what is there. And I thought that the videos #34 to 36 (I watched those the last few days) would be really helpful for these fast passages in your piece. You talk about string crossings as the problem. The remedy for that one really is (at least for me) practicing with the bow line. Also to find out whether the problem in the string crossing is in the right hand or whether it is triggered by insecurity in the left. That just becomes so obvious when you practice with the bow line. 

But in this recording I feel the more obvious area of work would be left and right hand coordination and intonation inconsistencies, not necessarily at string crossings but in the fast passages. 

I have struggled just yesterday again with the beginning of the Boccherini Minuet. The first and the third notes of these first four sixteenth are both A - but do you think I can manage to have the same A on both notes?? There is just one little sixteenth between them but it is enough to slightly change my finger position - grrr! Yesterday I tried to build up the four notes from the last one ("add a note backwards") and it seemed to make a difference (at original speed and definitely with Intonia running!). I'll see whether it will still have made a difference when I start practicing today in a little while...

Haha, here I am really wholeheartedly recommending these videos today as the remedy - I might recommend the next few tomorrow once I have watched them :). There is just such a wealth of hints and tricks in this practice course. 

Christiane
Posted: July 1, 2018
Hello Mary,
Great that you post again! 
Admirable how you manage to hold the speed all through the piece - I always tend to slow down...it's really great how you manage that!

My first impression was, "what's the rush?"  To me it appears that you want to run/race before you can walk.  Therefore you 'stumble' - the bow can't keep up....

So first of all, slow down a bit.  As Barbara also said. 

Also remember, to possibly practice bow lines first - I'm sure that would help with the string crossings. 

Looking forward to your next posting, same piece, or as you choose!

Barbara Habel
Posted: July 1, 2018
This discussion includes members-only video content

Dear Mary

I would start by analysing the exact measure of where you have problems with string crossings and mark them up or write the measure nummber down separately.

Then practice it slowly first to get it right. Then speed it up - as you work on each problematic measure at a time - by 3 bpm. Once that is fluent, speed up another 3bpm. Practice it once it is correct at least 5 times correctly.

Then insert the measures back into the piece by practicing a few notes before and after it to get used to the rest of the piece.

Work slowly and diligently. Spend time with it. And again, and again.

God bless and happy practicing.