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Dianne
Hello, I had posted this thread earlier this weekend, then decided to do some research since it might be outside the scope of this blog to discuss bridge carving. :) I did find some information on these tip areas here. I have looked at many, many pictures of bridges since then, and a few seem to be works of art and some are very rough. Along with wood choice, placement and measurements, the carving of a bridge seems to be about removal of weight, and where the wood is removed is up to the carver according to the particular instrument. These two areas referenced by the arrows are the place where I see the most differentiation between bridges. Some look smooth, some gauged, some tapered, some blunt, some not carved at all. It would be great to see a professionally carved bridge on a sololist's violin to see what it looks like. What does your bridge look like? How does it affect the sound? Have you ever thought of getting a new bridge made for your instrument?


Dianne
3 Responses
Posted: April 16, 2018
Last Comment: April 17, 2018
Replies

Barbara Habel
Posted: April 17, 2018
Dear Dianne

On the link you provide on the picture on top there is a bow lying on the chair. I did this once and then sat down. Luckyly I felt it and did not proceed to sit down fully. The bow was safe due to its flexibility. But I had quite a fright.

I found the odd shaped bridge far left in the fourth row very interesting. And impressed with its stability for the E and G string. They look so fragile.

Dianne
Posted: April 16, 2018
Hi Barb, here is a link to a gallery with some old bridges.

After looking at some soloist bridges, I'm convinced that what is important is what the shapes do for that particular instrument's sound, and the style of carving that that particular luthier does. I think it could look any number of ways, and some of them are quite interesting to see.

Barbara Habel
Posted: April 16, 2018
Dear Dianne

I literally just have put the knife down from adjusting the hight of my G string on my bridge on my good violin.

Then I treated my violin to a round of polish as well as my bow with the German made violin polish "Viol". I unscrewed my bow and let the hair hang down whilst polishing the bow between markers.

Since I play with the Russian bow hold I have difficulty getting a clean D string without hitting the G string. My teacher then played my violin and said to put something under the D string to make it higher. Then I opted for lowering the G string and she said ok.

The whole bridge got a once over with the carving knife a few years ago. So I am not a stranger to meddling with the bridge.

DISCLAIMER: I DO NOT RECOMMEND ANYONE DOING THIS - GO TO A LUTHIER !!!

But I too would be interested to see soloists bidges.

Interesting to see that all those bridges have little grooves for the string to stay put. My good and my cheep violins did not have this when I got them. When you buy a bridge it does not have them either. Is this something happening over the course of decades of the bridge in use?