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Beth Blackerby
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Beth Blackerby
13 Responses
Posted: March 18, 2018
Last Comment: April 15, 2018
Replies

Beth Blackerby
Posted: April 15, 2018
Oooh, I love that term :backchaining !


Elizabeth TeSelle
Posted: April 15, 2018
Backchaining! Very useful in teaching all kinds of behaviors. I have used it often in dog training, as well as in learning dressage tests, but had not thought to apply it to the violin.  Thanks!

Violin Claudia
Posted: April 11, 2018
Just to report back.

This is indeed helping me with the sixteenth runs in Vivaldi RV522.


Thank you so much!

Here is what it ought to sound like:
https://youtu.be/pqwCsO06JNI

Not sure I'll manage that quality in my life time 😉

Violin Claudia
Posted: March 29, 2018

that was so helpful...especially as I am having trouble with fast playing! I had been musing about how to speed things up and how to practise speed. (always followed the 'play it slowly......' mantra which you mentioned at the beginning)
Thanks!

P.S.: you should get your website people to add a button for liking posts. I don't always have the time to respond but would love to let y'all know that I watched and 'LIKED' i.e. appreciated your input.

Alan Barnicoat
Posted: March 20, 2018
I assumed the Video in which Beth discusses establishing musical goals, phrasing,dynamics etc. was step 7 even thought it is not labeled as such.  (posted March 9th.)

Beth Blackerby
Posted: March 19, 2018
Oops, I think this was supposed to be 7, Jaime. You didn't miss anything.

Jaime - Orlando , Fl
Posted: March 19, 2018
Very insightful training!.... but did I just missed step 7 somewhere?
Thanks in advance! :0)

Susan Hollister
Posted: March 19, 2018
I have never heard of this technique before, and I think it is brilliant! Thank you!

Kara
Posted: March 19, 2018
As someone who has been self-teaching after many, many years away from the violin, this is not something I would've known about! Thanks Beth. Looking forward to putting this into use now. I'm in Suzuki Book 3 and there are a couple of pieces right now that I need coordination with (bowing of course) but also coming down from the E string playing a series of notes on the A string. Here's to progress!

Beth Blackerby
Posted: March 19, 2018
Good question, Alan. I think it should be used for targeting difficult or tricky passages. For instance, as I play through a piece I'm working on, when I hear something that is not well coordinated, or is clumsy and uneven, then I use this method to clean it up. Beyond a measure or so, one might start to lose focus, so I would first start with targeting a few tricky places, with anywhere from 5 to 10 notes, working backwards.

Inge, this kind of practice, like I mentioned to Alan is great to work on isolating and tackling hard passages, but totally can be applied in an overall approach to learning a piece as well. My analogy is that working forwards is like slowly walking into deeper and deeper water, where as going backwards is the opposite: every repetition is like walking back into shallow (less scary) water.

My personal approach to working on any piece however,  is to work on it in bits and pieces anyway, so whether I start at the beginning, end or middle it doesn't matter. The Add a Note backwards technique seems to work well for me with the tricky bits.

Alan Barnicoat
Posted: March 19, 2018
Should the Up-To-Tempo/Add-A-Note practice technique be done in measure by measure increments, phrase by phrase, moving forward to the end, or do you recommend just starting from the very end of the entire piece and work back to the beginning note by note? Or does it matter?

Inge Black
Posted: March 19, 2018
Beth, I don't want to bring this thread into another direction, and if I'm doing that, then tell me and I'll delete this.  You have introduced the backward practise together with playing quickly or at tempo.   This is a powerful idea, and an alternative that makes sense, to the idea of gradually increasing speed from a slow tempo.

Well, backward practise is something I learned even for beginning to work on a piece, because then you are working toward the familiar from the unfamiliar, instead of from what is barely mastered toward what is even less mastered.  It was introduced to me by my piano teacher and I've never looked back.  How do you feel about this application for violin? And again, if this does not belong here,  (too much a side topic), I'll gladly delete.

Ray
Posted: March 18, 2018
This will be  more challenging for me.  I'm more of  a son file  type person.