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Courtney
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Courtney
11 Responses
Posted: March 6, 2018
Last Comment: March 12, 2018
Replies

Beth Blackerby
Posted: March 12, 2018
This discussion includes members-only video content



Christopher Sinkule
Posted: March 10, 2018
Hmm I think I might see the problem. I don't think your elbow is changing enough when you change strings. Your elbow mostly stays at a double stop A-D level. I'm guessing this might make the wrist movement more difficult because your hand is not in the same plane as your elbow most of the time. Especially the E-string, your elbow should be completely down on the E-string, if you look at about 27-29 seconds of your new video, it is too high. Once the elbow levels are worked out and well defined it should make it easier for the wrist to bend on the upbow near the frog.

Courtney
Posted: March 10, 2018
This discussion includes members-only video content

I tried to focus my bowing on the frog. When I try to bend my wrist at the frog it seems to make my bow more crooked

Beth Blackerby
Posted: March 9, 2018
Courtney, yes, that was better for sure. You were better about keeping the bow straight and in a good sounding point zone. You also were able to get closer to the frog than in the first video. I still encourage you to do lots of right hand only work, as this will increase your progress so much

Elke Meier
Posted: March 9, 2018
I would also put a masking tape mark on the bow stick close to the frog, Courtney. You still pretty consistently ignore the lower half of the bow and I know from my own markings on the stick that while I "feel" I am at the frog the markings tell when I REALLY am at the frog. Then watch the marking and only change bow direction when the marking reaches the string area. Your right arm need to learn how it feels to get to the frog area. And it seems like you need to trick the arm to into getting that feel :).

Christopher Sinkule
Posted: March 9, 2018
The second video is definitely an improvement. I think all you need to do is bend the wrist on your upbows once you pass the half mark on your bow. Try adding a bit of weight to your bow arm, it should help with the bit of shakyness, just be sure itís weight from your arm and not pressing with the index finger on the bow. I agree with Barbara, doing this in a mirror is probably the safest way. For your left hand, I see that your third and fourth finger tend to snuggle up to your second finger when they arenít in use, this makes speed and intonation much harder because they have to extend every time you want to use them. See if you can keep those 2 fingers ďhoveringĒ over their spots instead of them retracting into the second finger (it will take some work since itís natural for our fingers to rest together)

Courtney
Posted: March 9, 2018
I'm kind of happy with the second video. but I don't know if I'm blinded because it's my own video ha

Elke Meier
Posted: March 9, 2018
What would your own answer to the question be, Courtney?

Courtney
Posted: March 9, 2018
This discussion includes members-only video content

I'm not sure if this video is any better with the right arm

Barbara Habel
Posted: March 7, 2018
Dear Courtney

Your bow arm looks almost straight. But what you need for it to go exactely straight is to bend your bowing arm "wrist" as you get nearer the frog. Try this in slow motion whilst looking at a mirror.

You sound quite nice. Keep up the good work.

Beth Blackerby
Posted: March 6, 2018
This discussion includes members-only video content

Courtney, are you following the practice sequence I'm posting here on the Community Page? I think this would be a perfect piece to use. In particular, mapping out the right hand would offer lots of learning opportunities for your bow arm, and there are all sorts of bow techniques in this piece that would be valuable to isolate and study up close. Here's the video that describes the process.  It is quite time consuming, but I think you'll reap the benefits many times over.