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Patricia

Hi Beth:

In order to get familiar with shifting and the violin fingerboard, Iím practicing G Major scale in 3-Octaves using Ivan Galamian ďContemporary Violin Technique Volume One of Scale and Arpeggio Exercises with Bowing and Rhythm PatternsĒ.

Beth, I have the impression that I saw an invited teacher in VL using Galamianís scales. If Iím wrong, Do you have a good fingering and shifting for the above mentioned scale?

Galamianís indications of fingering shows to do the shifting to 3rd position in D-string finger 1 for G-note at the beginning of second octave; then shifting to 5th position in E-string-finger 1 for the C-note; ending with finger 4 for the F-note and extending the same finger 4 for the top G-note.

Now, the only indications for descending are: finger 2 for B-note on E-string 3rd position; and then, finger 2 in F-note probably on D-string 1st position. In his video cassette of a G Major lesson to a boy, I try to pay attention when he does the shifting, but always miss it.

Do you think Iím interpreting his notations correctly?

Maia Bang (student of Leopold Auer, same as Galamianís teacher) instructions about 3-octaves scales are a ďCombined Paganini - Schradieck FingeringĒ as she mentioned in her book. Her indications are similar to Galamian when ascending except that the shifting to 3rd position is in A-string instead of D-string, and descending in the same way.

There are many different fingering for scales as books in the field. Any suggestion, will be appreciated.

Thanking you in advance for your outstanding job, I remain cordially yours,

Tricia

Patricia
11 Responses
Posted: August 11, 2011
Last Comment: August 12, 2011
Replies

jojo
Posted: August 12, 2011
wish I could 'edit' the posts I have submitted....never mind...wanted to edit that I actually do 'not' know inversions by memory (I wish! LOL), I am still fairly new to them and for those I 'do' rely on reading them from the music! ;) 

jojo
Posted: August 12, 2011
Hi Tricia, 
I actually don't use the Galamian for the scales hehehe
my teacher asked me to do the 'acceleration' exercise' from the book ;) (I have also and occasionally do the scales in one position too, the one octave ones up to 10th position or sometimes 12th, I have lots of fun on that one :))

Teacher got me to learn all scales from memory, I have never looked at one scale from a book with my teacher (originally), learnt all of them major and minor up to 3 octaves with no book...that's the kind of teacher he is...but now I do look at them on the Sevcik opus 1 part 3 book and I have also learnt arpeggios/dominants/diminished/inversions from memory and now he gets me to look at them on the Sevcik book as he believes you have to learn to know what 'they look like' so that when you sight read music you will recognise the 'pattern' and you will go in your head 'AAAHHHHH' I know that! that is a 'Bmajor arpeggio/scale/whatever' and you just 'play it' ;) LOL

Of course I have seen scales/arpeggios etc on music/printed before, and I know what they look like, it's just that he usually always asked me to play them not from the music but from memory, and now he makes a point of pulling the sevcik book out on purpose.

Patricia
Posted: August 12, 2011

Jojo, it is good to know you are using Galamian for your scales, so in the future we can share opinions and experiences.

After I purchased Sevcik School of Bowing for Violin, Op.2, Book 1 and 2, I found out that is Public Domain and you can get it for free. Oh well!! canít win all the times.

Thanks Jojo

My best!

Tricia


jojo
Posted: August 12, 2011
ok, I see the IMSLP library was already in the resource page, but the 'free violin sheet music' was not, so at least I have contributed with 'one new' website ;)

jojo
Posted: August 12, 2011
Ok, here is the link to Download Sevcik Opus 1 part 3


Beth, I have not looked, forgive me...(blush) so it may be there already, but if it's not, could you put this in the resource pages:


And also this:


thank you :)

jojo
Posted: August 12, 2011
Hi Tricia,
I also use the Galamian 'Contemporary Violin Technique Volume One', it is one of the many books of the violinists 'staple' diet  ;) hehehe
alongside many others like the famous sevcik for example.
If you can one day grab a copy of sevcik opus 1 part 3 (I think you can also find it for free on the internet, if I find the link I'll post it here actually or I'll ask Beth to put it up on the resources page) and on that book you can find the scales over 3 octaves and the G major scale is given with 2 different fingering, and the 2 different fingering on offer are the two you mentioned, one shifting on the D string and one shifting on the A string.

Beth Blackerby
Posted: August 12, 2011
That's good to hear. Practicing with the tuner and going back to "reposition" your finger placement is the best way to build good intonation!

Patricia
Posted: August 12, 2011

Thatís great Beth! Just take your time, I know what it is to be a working mother and jojo help me a lot already.

Meanwhile, I have plenty with playing the scale using a tuner and very careful try to be in the correct pitch or as accurate as possible, if Iím too far, (of course Iím not using any kind of vibrato) I go to the previous note and try again. I believe this will help me to train my ears to recognize the note and the interval.

My best!

Tricia


Beth Blackerby
Posted: August 12, 2011
Tricia,  I have been working on a series of videos for scales. I had just shot the video for the "advanced" G scale, but after shooting, noticed that the belt tie on my shirt had come undone. Don't know why I never catch these things before hand...lol Anyway, I'm on the road to finishing, and I have a set of fingerings and a slightly different approach for practicing these scales. I think you'll like it. The fingering you described is fine. THe point is, as Jo mentioned, there are many different possibilities for fingerings. My philosophy, is that it is best to keep them varied (which is the basis for these "Scale Rounds" I'm close to finishing).  I should have these finished. Soon. My kids go back to school on the 23rd of August, which will greatly impact my productivity...lol.

Patricia
Posted: August 12, 2011

Thank you jojo for your help. I appreciate it.

It is nice to confirm that Iím practicing in the same way as others.

I agree, as probably your teacher does, it is one of the good ways to approach the shifting and fingering for this scale. May or may not be the best, but it is a good way.

Thank you again.

Tricia


jojo
Posted: August 12, 2011
Hi Tricia, I think your question 'almost got missed' so I am replying to it mainly so that Beth can see it (as it got pushed to 2nd page), but also to say that: yes, there is often different ways to play a scale (well, especially with 3 or 4 octave scales anyway). My teacher prefers me to play the 3 octave G major scale the way you described 'Maia Bang' instructions tells you to: by ascending on the A string. Why I don't know, I never asked him! He will probably have a reason for it, well, my teacher normally has a good reason for everything anyway but 3/4 of the times I don't ask him, I should start asking him really, but I find that even if I don't as I mature as a player I find out for myself the reasons ;) Now I hand this 'over to Beth' :)