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Lukas Köpl
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Hey everyone

it's been quite some time (again lol).
I wanted to share with you a practice video that I did (and am planning on doing regularly).
This time it is the C major scale that I wanted to practice. The objectives for this session were:

1. Intonation
2. Bowing
3. Notes of the C Major Scale


I'm looking forward reading your comments. I know it is not perfect and I would really liket you to pin-point my mistakes.  Thanks! :) 



Lukas Köpl
19 Responses
Posted: July 19, 2017
Last Comment: August 6, 2017
Replies

Beth Blackerby
Posted: August 6, 2017
This discussion includes members-only video content



Beth Blackerby
Posted: July 30, 2017
Alan, I'm very glad to hear you experienced these concepts on a deep level. Truly, it doesn't matter what any teacher says about playing, each player has to come to their own deep sense of understanding. I like your experiment!

Alan Barnicoat
Posted: July 29, 2017
Thanks Diane. You can also draw a line on the cardboard from one corner to its opposite for a path to follow and to prove to yourself that you are drawing the bow straight even though the elbow is making a curve.

Dianne
Posted: July 29, 2017
Hi Alan, I think you just invented a practice aid - brilliant!

Alan Barnicoat
Posted: July 29, 2017
Another lesson in being mindful.
I've always had difficulty in understanding how the hand and elbow of the bow arm can stay on the same plane until now. After reading Beth's recent description, I finally realized that my misunderstanding came from equating " height" with "level" and "plane."

The words "in tandem" and " plane, parallel to the floor" intrigued me. So, I grabbed  a large piece of cardboard which  was leaning against the side of my desk with my left hand and placed it on my left shoulder (parallel to the floor) - as if it were a violin. Then, I kept my right hand and elbow at the same hight by resting my forearm on the cardboard while pretending to play the G string. As I continued on to "play" toward the higher strings,D,A,E, I continued to rest my forearm on the piece of cardboard while  gradually tilting it toward a more perpendicular position (following the curve of the bridge).  Keeping my entire forearm in contact with the cardboard proved to me that the hand and elbow do literally work together (i.e. in tandem) by staying on the same plane even though they can appear to be at different heights when moving. Also, by resting my forearm on the cardboard as it tilted, I became more aware of the weight of the arm as it moves.   So, the hand and elbow do remain on the same plane while drawing the bow on a straight trajectory, though the plane itself is not necessarily level with the floor.  I guess I'm just repeating what has already been stated many times....I just needed the physical experience to hammer it home.

Dianne
Posted: July 29, 2017
That sounds great, Beth. How exciting for you & your students!

Beth Blackerby
Posted: July 28, 2017
Hi Lukas, I haven't forgotten about you, it's just that my studio is out of commission presently. Any day now, I'll be moving into my new studio! It's taken forever, but we've built a tall room in the backyard for me to teach out of and to record videos for Violin Lab. I can't wait!! All the equipment is torn down and I'm operating on my laptop. 

Meanwhile, let me try and explain what I meant. Think about the trajectory of the bow when it is on different strings. When you are bowing on the G or D string, the bow is traveling more or less parallel to the floor. When you're on the A and E strings, the trajectory angles are changed, not perpendicular to the floor, but more vertical than on the  lower strings. Now imagine that the bow is resting on the G string at the frog. Think about the level of your elbow. Now imagine he bow is resting on the G string at the tip. The hand/elbow is also at the same level in its relationship to the floor since the bow is basically moving horizontally. So as you draw the bow, the hand/elbow level stays on the same plane. 

Do the same mental exercise with the E string. When you're at the frog, the hand/elbow level is higher than when you're at the tip, because as you draw the bow you're not going side to side anymore, but more up and down. So when you're on those higher strings, if your and is following the frog in a downward direction, and your elbow stays at its higher position, as it was when you started the bow stoke at the frog, then the hand and arm aren't traveling together not he same plan. That's why there's a sense of the elbow lowering as you draw the bow on the A and E strings. As you practice, make sure your elbow moves in tandem with the hand. 

I hope this is a little clearer. I can't wait to get making videos again. Soon, I hope!

Lukas Köpl
Posted: July 28, 2017
Thank you Diane :)

Diane in SOCAL
Posted: July 28, 2017
Bring this to the top of the Community Page for Beth to see.
Bring this thread to the top…hopefully Beth will see it and make a response video as Lukas mentioned it might help him to understand more about his bowing arm. : >) 
Diane. 

Susan Hollister
Posted: July 25, 2017
Demo Response?
I was just wondering if Beth made a demo response to this video?

Elke Meier
Posted: July 20, 2017
Just a note to Intonia: the PC version is 25$. The Android App with a little reduced functions is around 5$. 

Lukas Köpl
Posted: July 20, 2017
@Beth

Thank you Beth! Was the sharp C that I hit kind of a micro-tone within the range of a C natural and C# ? While playing it it didn't feel like a full C sharp but I thought that I was definitely off the C natural.
Yes, I did notice that nice ringing when I corrected it. It was an interesting feeling. Concerning my bowing hand:  I completely missed that part of my arm not lifting and adjusting to the respective string that I was on. I am going to improve upon it! Promised! :)

However, I'm not quite sure I understood your last explanation. Would it be okay for you if you demoed it for me? ^^ I would really like to understand it fully.  Thousand thanks!

@ Barb Wimmer,

thanks Barb(ara? :-)  ). I think I am a bit too focused on the marks on my guitar. 
I try to play those according to what I hear. I'll try out the suggested app by @Barbara H,  Intonia. It looks amazing. I'll make sure to check that out. However, :-) first, I would need to renew my subscription to violinlab.com as it runs out soon. I hope to be able to pay it immediately.



Barb Wimmer
Posted: July 19, 2017
That sounds great intonia.com. Lots of detail. I just use my basic tuner to tune my violin and it tells me if I am playing b flat or b of c or C sharp etc. I will have to check out intonia-thx Barbara. I'm slowly getting more techy and think can figure out

Beth Blackerby
Posted: July 19, 2017
Hi Lucas, nice to see you back on the community page! Nice C major! Did you hear how much more resonant your tone grew when you adjusted from the sharp C (wasn't really a true C#) to a C natural? Your violin started ringing beautifully! You're doing such a good job keeping your bow straight, and your bow hold looks great. There are a few adjustments to make with your bow arm though. As you make the down bow on all of the strings except the G, the angle of the bow to the bridge is at a slant, which means if you keep your elbow at the same level as your hand as you bow, the arm will have to lower as it follows the hand down. Your elbow is staying at a fixed level and therefore rocks the angle of the bow so that you graze another string. Does this make sense? I'd be happy to demo if need be.

Barbara Habel
Posted: July 19, 2017
Dear Lukas

Barb is right about the tuner as being a helpful tool.

There is a programm called Intonia.com that is an excellent learning tool. You can use the free trial period to see whether you like it. And when you decide to buy it it costs about Euro 25.

Barb Wimmer
Posted: July 19, 2017
Very good. Sometimes I use a tuner as I play notes to make sure I am exact as can be on tone but your tone is good. 

Lukas Köpl
Posted: July 19, 2017
@Elke

Thank you so much! I am going to take a note of my bowing arm. To be honest, I completely missed that one. Thanks for pointing it out. 


@Barbara

You are right. I am definitely going to add the metronome the next time. This was rather meant as an exercise to practice the other points but you are definitely right that I need to include the metronome.  ^^ Thanks! I hope to be able to improve upon this video the next week.


Cheers,

Lukas

Barbara Habel
Posted: July 19, 2017
Dear Lukas

You are doing well.

You might want to add an extra category for judging your learning - the metronome.

Most people dislike playing with the metronome. So when you start playing with it early on in your studies you can get used to it.

Your rhythm is speeding up. That is why I am suggesting this.

Elke Meier
Posted: July 19, 2017
Intonation: That was very good, Luke! Really good intonation. The only "glitch" there (according to my ears) is that the B as the leading tone needs to be a tad higher. In the last version I felt it was okay, but in the first two rounds to my feeling it was a bit too low. 

Bowing: Nice and straight! No skidding around between bridge and fingerboard. But there are things that you could still work on in terms of bowing. Watch your elbow when you go up the scale as compared to going down the scale. On the way up your elbow and arm level adjust to each string level. When you go down the scale there is hardly any change in elbow/arm level between A- and D-string. Only when you get to the G-string does the arm level visibly adjust.
And one more suggestion: Since you are secure about the notes and the intonation of the C-major scale now would be a good point to concentrate on the right hand and vary your bowing. At the moment you stay very much in the middle of the bow. Try playing the scale with drawn out notes that use the whole bow from the frog to the very tip. That is the best way to really learn what the "bi-fold door" feels like in your arm.