Community
You must be a member to respond to discussions.
Discussion

Andrea Baroni
This discussion includes members-only video content

Hi everybody,

It has been a while now since my last video, but I finally managed to record some new pieces this week!
In the last couple of months, I have finally started studying volume 2 of the Suzuki book (along with some fiddle tunes which are always fun :) ). So I recorded Musette and Judas Maccabaeus.

I am quite happy about the left hand now, it looks a bit less bent. The bowing instead is a bit crooked, especially on Musette, but I suspect it also depends on having changed the shoulder rest recently (I am now using the Bon Musica one), since it took quite a while to get used to it, and I still feel that my arm movement still needs some adjustments compared to what I was used to...
Also, I am focusing a bit more on the dynamics and probably when I want to do a "piano" I tend to play closer to the fingerboard, but this transition from the fingerboard to the bridge makes the bowing less straight I think... I am making a bit of mess sometimes :)

As always, thanks for watching and for all your feedback!

ps: I have also started practicing vibrato in the last couple of months, but I am not trying it on this video (I will record another video soon of an easier song probably, so to start trying it on an actual piece!).
Andrea Baroni
9 Responses
Posted: April 18, 2017
Last Comment: April 23, 2017
Replies

Ann Meeker
Posted: April 23, 2017
Thank you, Elke, that makes sense, I like that practice tip too.

Elke Meier
Posted: April 23, 2017
Ann, you just watch your thumb. Is it just resting against the neck or is it pressing? As long as it is resting I don't think there is a problem. I think it is a question of becoming aware: Oh, that was too much counter pressure. Sometimes this is hard to feel. When practicing at times I take the thumb off the neck and place my next finger, then I let the thumb rest back in its place. Then I can somehow feel it again. Or feel how it SHOULD be.

Ann Meeker
Posted: April 23, 2017
Elke, thx for the share on Laurie Scott's "walking fingers" video, I'm going to give that some practice attention.  But I am puzzled about how it looks like her left hand is doing the dreaded squeeze-neck, maybe it's just the video angle?  Obviously she totally knows what she is doing whereas I'm still in the learning stage on trying to get comfortable with finding the magic spot between "barely touching" the neck versus too much space or the opposite clenching.  

Ann Meeker
Posted: April 23, 2017
Andrea, you play so musically and cleanly, very nice!

Barb Wimmer
Posted: April 22, 2017
Sounds great, I like that song, fun song to play Musette

Andrea Baroni
Posted: April 22, 2017
Thanks as always for your wonderful feedback, encouragement and links!

Having your favorite teacher proud of you is one of the most motivating things in the world :)
I'll definitely try now to address that left-hand positioning problem!

Beth Blackerby
Posted: April 21, 2017
Andrea, I almost teared up seeing that beautiful finger motion in your right hand! I can't believe how far that has come! I'm so proud of you. As for your left hand, brining your hand higher in relation to the neck may help, but what I see that concerns me is that I think you are overcompensating for your care not to squeeze the neck. Although I couldn't see how much space is between your hand in the neck, it looks to be too much, especially on the E string. Creating a higher arch with the fingers should bring your hand a little closer. We do need to be very close to the neck to have security for intonation. I'm sure you've seen this video, but give it one more watch. See if you can minimize the space to the point that you still feel comfortable. 

Diane in SOCAL
Posted: April 19, 2017
Hi Andrea…greetings from So. California.  I agree with Elke that your base knuckles of your left hand are too low. When she mentions the elbow swings a bit to help the left hand, it also will help your left hand position in holding the violin when you playing on the G string…move the elbow more to the right and when on the E string…move the elbow more to the left. Other wise the left elbow should be under the violin.  
Have a look at this great web site, toddehle.com  for more information on placement of the left hand for violin hold and finger placement.  Videos # 4 and #5 will help you see where the left thumb should be placed  and the index finger that brushes the neck at the base joint.  Todd is a wonderful teacher.  When Beth had her first violin workshop in Austin back in 2012…she had Todd here and I took his Master class…he helped me with my elbow position and raising the left hand base joint up to get the fingers up and over the fingerboard to improve intonation.  Good luck.  Nice playing.  
Stay tuned. Diane in SoCal 

Elke Meier
Posted: April 18, 2017
Wow, Andrea, congratulations to starting Suzuki 2! I really like your tone, your intonation, and the lightness of your bow. Yes, you are right, it gets tricky when you try to change sounding points to give it some expression. Somehow the bow then tends to take on a life of its own :). But I thought you did pretty good in that! I could clearly hear your change in dynamics! Very, very nice.

As for your left hand you are right, it is very different from what it used to be. Especially this turning out of the hand when you played first finger on the E-string is just so different now. However, I think you could be even happier about your left hand if you brought the knuckle line a bit higher. If you turn the video on half speed you can really observe what happens with your left hand. Watch what your fourth finger does between :40 and :46. First you are on the E-string. It is quite normal that for that the knuckle line is lower than the fingerboard. But when you change to the A-string your elbow should swing forward just a wee bit so that your knuckle line can come up. That does not happen - with the result that the fourth finger has to really stretch and instead of a nicely curved finger you reach the E on the A-string with a completely stretched out fourth finger. That is a real pity because your fingers are all very long and COULD be easily curved and come more from above. The same is true at :59 for the third finger. It really has to stretch. But the shape of the fingers should be about the same across the strings. It is hard to explain what I mean. But please watch Laurie Scott's video on the walking fingers and observe how her arm and fingers adjust to the different string levels. When you compare that to your own wrist/arm movement I think you will see what I mean. This is much better in the Judas Maccabaeus. Toward the end your third finger is still curved as you go up with your hand to reach the D-string. 

Now, Andrea, please take this observation with a grain of salt. I have much smaller hands, so have to move much more to clear the strings. Maybe with your size hands you don't have to do it as much? I don't know, but I just thought I shared what I observed. If this is not a correct observation for your situation I am sure Beth will chime in and put it right.