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Jaime - Orlando , Fl
Quick question... local teacher is introducing shifting. He first wants me to shift between 1st and 2nd position. We are starting with shifting in a way where the "dragging" sound doesn't show. As he explains .... "if I close my eyes and I'm listening... I don't want to be able to hear the shifting sound"... watching Beth videos - his approach is a little different .

He is  starting between 1st and 2nd position ( we are using  Belwin course for strings - actually - second and fourth position - but first exercises are between first and second positions in that book).

So...is this initial approach he wants to adopt for now is what its called " classical shifting"? - just curious. Thank you in advance! :0)
Jaime - Orlando , Fl
13 Responses
Posted: March 20, 2017
Last Comment: March 21, 2017
Replies

Lisa, Houston-TX
Posted: March 21, 2017
I haven't reached the shifting exercises, but from your video, you seem like a natural at it. Great work!

Dianne
Posted: March 21, 2017
Yes, no matter how much distance between notes, or when crossing strings between notes, always keeping a finger on the string as a reference along the way is something I need to be constantly reminded of right now while learning- otherwise it becomes an open string shift!

Jaime - Orlando , Fl
Posted: March 21, 2017
Dianne, Rustam, Beth and Bjorn... thank you for your comments! truly appreciated!
I am certainly following Beth's tutorials on this! As a matter of fact, as soon as he mentioned we were introducing shifting,  I started with VL's tutorials!

DEFINITELY he wants me to slide, with the constant bowing... from take off to arrival notes... is just that he wants me to do it quietly. I am still doing the tutorials here, so I'm getting a little bit of both... "classical" and "romantic" shifts! hehe...

Thanks for the reference Bjorn! I will sure check it out! :)

Bjørn Larsen
Posted: March 21, 2017
Hi Jaime

Have you seen this tutorial by Yehudi Menuhin:
He makes the motion of the left hand fingers an important part of the shifting motion.
To me it looks like it is meant to be used in quick shifts.

Bjørn

Beth Blackerby
Posted: March 21, 2017
Jaime, the video Rustam references is probably what your teacher is wanting you to do. I do have a few overview videos where I demonstrate audible shifts, but the beginning shifting videos are about the "ghost" slide shifts. But regardless the explanation, you should always shift with a finger sliding on the string and with the bow continuously making sound, i.e. no stopping the bow. The degree to which the finger adds pressure entirely depends on the context: whether it's shifting on the same finger - one finger to a different finger - ascending vs descending etc.   I'm sure your teacher is training you correctly. I would only disagree if he has you shifting without sliding the finger at all. 

Rustam Gill
Posted: March 21, 2017
Hi Jaime,
Congratulations on beginning shifting! 

I don't want to assume what your teacher is intending to teach but I think he might mean that when you do the shift from 1st to 2nd position you first release finger pressure on the string enough so that you can only hear the harmonic pitch as you slide on the string. This way the shift is barely audible. You can hear it but the audience cannot really hear. As you slide the finger you listen for the target pitch harmonic. When you find the pitch you put the finger down all the way and the audience hears only the two notes, not the slide in between.

Have you seen this video?
Beth demonstrates all the possible ways a finger could move while shifting. Do any of these ways seem like what your teacher is intending?

Good luck!

Dianne
Posted: March 20, 2017
Hi Jaime, oh I see what you are doing now. I use those kinds of shifts on fast shifts. They are hard because you can't really hear the note coming. They require lots of practice of the feel of the shift. I am very interested in this discussion!

Jaime - Orlando , Fl
Posted: March 20, 2017
This discussion includes members-only video content

Better yet.... try to show...what he wants me to do....

Jaime - Orlando , Fl
Posted: March 20, 2017
Maria, Elke and Dianne... thank you for your posts!  What happened Beth was that as he gave me the assignment, I watch  your tutorials on the basics of shifting.... and when I came back I was following your way... doing the Balwin exercises...

I was shifting with the whole shifting "wave" being loud and clear.... I guess he wants me to tone it down so it doesn't sound so "forced" and loud... so maybe that's why he wants me to "slide quietly"! hehe....

He says later on we will work on "romantic" melodies that will require some "audible shift" , but what he wants me to do now is slide that first finger from hand position 1 to 2 quietly... if that makes any sense!

There is a method to the madness.... so I'm giving it a chance , but still doing your tutorials on it! Shhhhh..... is a secret! hehe

He is ok! I don't think he will mind at all....he knows I follow you and your tutorials... but is interesting to see where his approach will take us! hehe :0)

Thank you again!

Dianne
Posted: March 20, 2017
Hi Jaime, it is my understanding that, yes, that is the classical shift, but there is always some expressively handled string sound with that. I love the sounds of classical shifts- there are many variations, and I find they all have some sound to them if I listen closely. It's an art I hope to one day be able to do to add expression with shifts even in classical pieces.

Elke Meier
Posted: March 20, 2017
For my own practice on shifting I had two different approaches: there is the direct shift from one note to the other. This I did with Beth's explanation and the different steps she has in the shifting videos. But I also used Geringas, and the first exercise of Geringas is going up the fingerboard with one finger, playing open strings in between (like: A,B,A,C,A,D,A,E... and all fingered notes played with the first finger). This cannot be done with the sliding exercise. Rather your finger has to find its place after the open string just like that. In the beginning this was VERY challenging, but I found it a very, very helpful exercise. And I still often start shifting practice with this kind of exercise. It gives me a good feel for the distances. 

Maria
Posted: March 20, 2017


I am using Belwin too and my teacher likes it ...

I remember from Beth and my teacher as we learn in the beginning we slide to the shift note then much, much later,  to try not make so much sound.

Beth Blackerby
Posted: March 20, 2017
How exactly does he want you to do this, so that you don't hear the slide? What will the bow do?