Community
You must be a member to respond to discussions.
Discussion

Elke Meier
This discussion includes members-only video content

Such beautiful music! And on first sight this looked rather straightforward and easy - just a few measures that would be really challenging. But now, when I started to work on it in earnest, I found it not quite so clear - and anything but easy. Intonation is going to be a real challenge! And then the shifts... I will have to practice each one individually. Those high notes are quite a bit outside my comfort zone... Can those of you with more experience please look at my marked up music and tell me whether my markup makes sense? I am especially interested in what you think about the shifts.


Elke Meier
44 Responses
Posted: January 10, 2017
Last Comment: February 24, 2017
Replies

Cynthia Alpers
Posted: February 24, 2017
Oh...thanks...that clears it up. 

~ C

Elke Meier
Posted: February 24, 2017
Cindy, I had also posted the question in the Facebook group. This was Beth's answer:

Elke, yes, the up bows are for symmetry in order to have a consistent feel of the second note of each group receive the stronger pulse. Just use short , separated bow strokes. You should try and start each group in the same part of the bow. And either in the middle or near the tip, whichever is more comfortable. I would do it more in the middle and create a sweeping gesture for the staccato.

Cynthia Alpers
Posted: February 24, 2017
Elke,

That's funny...I have those notes circled too.  I think that you play them staccato and do a retake at the rests that immediately follow.  That's what I'm doing anyway.

~ C

Elke Meier
Posted: February 22, 2017
I have a bowing question myself: 

In La Follia in the Variation III in Violin IIA - how do I do those staccato notes? It is marked that I should start each group of three with an up bow. Why is that? Just for symmetry reasons (to be equal with Violin IIB) or does this mean that all three of them should be spiccato on upbows?

Elke Meier
Posted: February 22, 2017
Just a few comments, Cindy: 

I don't know what Beth will say to the up-bow start on Romance :) - we'll see... 

Violin 3 of the Romance part does not have the high notes and is rhythmically also a lot easier :).

As for MP3s: Here are the links again that Beth sent around: 

In my Dropbox folder for the workshop I have practice versions for the Romance and also cut apart MP3s for Simple Gifts and La Follia. I need those cut apart pieces because I need to load it in Speedshifter for the more challenging parts...

I really look forward to the Masterclass and was planning to get something as far as I can so I can really have them help me POLISH it. But I will be so busy just learning the workshop pieces (and I still need to do the recording for the ensemble...) that I doubt there will be much time left for practicing some other piece.


Cynthia Alpers
Posted: February 22, 2017
I looked at Romance, Violin I and I thought...Geesh...those high notes.  I'm not sure I am ready to hit those yet, since I've just started shifting.  So, I went on to the Violin II part.  I've got to tell you that it's not much easier.  There's still some troubling string crossings and weird flats in there.  Still...this is such a beautiful piece.  It really evokes the 1950s, doesn't it?  I'm excited to hear how we all sound playing it.  I think it will be amazing!

So Elke...are you proposing that we all start the piece on an upbow?  I'll have to try it to see how it feels.  What does Beth think of that idea?

~ C

Cynthia Alpers
Posted: February 22, 2017
Lily,

I remember clearly when we both had to do our masterclass pieces at the 2015 workshop.  Speaking for myself...I was terrified!  I had come to the workshop totally unaware that we had to even DO a masterclass piece.  I ended up doing one of the pieces that we did in our workshop performance.  But, in the end, it all worked out great.  Bill was my "teacher/critic" and he was so kind and wonderful.  I love that guy. 

The masterclass really is a great learning experience.  To the newbies, don't worry...everyone flubs up and makes mistakes and we all learn from them. Don't do something that you have totally wired and can play blindfolded.  Play a piece that you constantly have problems with and you'll learn a lot more from it. 

And don't forget to breathe.  :D 

~ C

Cynthia Alpers
Posted: February 22, 2017
I've been looking for versions of all of the music in MP3s.  The only one I haven't found yet is the Fantasy on Simple Gifts.  It's a, "fantasy," so I doubt I'll be successful.  However, Carrick Fergus is very easy to find.  It seems like everyone has done a version of it...even Van Morrison.  You just have to be sure that the version that you are downloading is in the same key that we are playing it in.  The one that I downloaded is obviously in a different key, so I'll have to go back and pick another one and do a play along, so I know that it's in the correct key.  Canon in D Major is also very easy to find .  (No worry about the wrong key here.)  I had to do a little digging to find Romance, but it's available.  I'm not thrilled with the downloaded version that I have right now, so I may continue searching.  Variazioni La Follia is a great one to download, even if you aren't planning to play along with it, because the recording can demonstrate the different variations and how they should sound. 

These are all easy to find, especially if you use Amazon Music, or some other online, music store.  Most of my downloads cost $0.99 each, so it wasn't a big expense.  Just be sure to pick the single recording, verses the entire album.  I don't think that I'm legally allowed to share them, because of copyright laws, sorry... but you should not have too many problems finding them.  It just takes a little time.  Try searching by using the composer's name, as well as the title.  Also, make sure that you are downloading from a reputable site. 

~ C



Elke Meier
Posted: February 21, 2017
Kristen, I don't have the sheet music for the Austin workshop. If it is the same as for the England one I would be happy to share my version with you. But I would be hesitant to share it here on the community page. You can email me at 2007elke@gmx.de and let me know which ones you have problems with, and I'll see whether I have it. 

Kristen Casenave
Posted: February 21, 2017
camp music austin June 2017
Elke, two of us are having trouble printing out violin 1 and violin 2 from Beth's dropbox
have tried for two DAYS--could you upload all the pieces for camp June 2017 in Austin, Texas--I realize this is a PAIN and thank you very MUCH in advance.


Lily Mo
Posted: January 30, 2017
Feel slightly apprehensive about being called an advanced player especially after this morning when I was complaining to my teacher how I can't play high on the e string without sounding like I'm strangling a bag of kittens. But I'll take it as a compliment. I

to make the most of the masterclass I would definitely bring a piece your working on. not a polished thing but something that can trip you up. I found I had most of my eureka moments watching others make connections in masterclass. For me, its going to be the chasm between practising and performance. 

Elke Meier
Posted: January 20, 2017
Start on up bow. You can then have the tone nicely go from a soft start to give it more volume. It is much easier than the other way round. And you always have the index finger to give weight to the bow at the tip, even on the G-string.

Maria
Posted: January 20, 2017


I tried to start on the up bow but I subconsciously start at the frog because in my head I need more weight to produce the sound on the thickest string w/c is the G string...

Now I am confused, start on up bow or down bow?

 :) oh my...

Elke Meier
Posted: January 15, 2017
You are so right, Stephen! I watched Nicola Benedetti's performance and marked her bowings and found out that she starts exactly the other way round from what I had. So I tried that and found it SO much easier to get a good tone and have the dynamic increase. Well, it does make sense, doesn't it, considering that the bow is the heaviest at the frog. I changed some other things also after Beth's tips on fingering and will post my new version when I have a scanner around again.

Stephen, Los Osos, CA
Posted: January 15, 2017
Up Down
Elke,

I just started only playing up to measure 10, to the C half note.

I find that if you reverse your bow markings and start the piece with an up 
bow, it seems to work better.  When I come to measure 8, I use up 
bows on the C,B slur then continue up on the C,A slur as shown.
This gives me a full down bow for measure 9, then up and down on
the C.

Maria
Posted: January 15, 2017
Thank you much Elke...

You're simply d best, thank you again...

Elke Meier
Posted: January 15, 2017
Maria, the links are in the same email where you received the Dropbox link - just scroll down. Or look here :)
Simple Gifts
Carrickfergus
Click on the button below the "Listen". I have been playing along with Carrickfergus - it is so beautiful!
Those are not MP3s though. You can just play along with the group. If I get around to it I might do something similar to what I did with the Romance (see the links in this post) to let people practice just their part.

Maria
Posted: January 15, 2017
'morning Elke,

Any MP3 for FANTASY ON SIMPLE GIFTS for V1 and V2?

I woke up early and I plan to practice and want listen to it as well...


Ai Beth's dropbox she only have the Rmnce mp3...

Thanks a million 

Robyn Stirling
Posted: January 14, 2017
Oh ok that's not so bad I can work with that.


jz
Posted: January 14, 2017
Hi Robyn, sorry, didn't mean to scare you! All I meant was that I think that there might be an opportunity for us to get some input on whatever we're working on individually (even just a scale), but I've not been to a workshop before and I don't know what Beth has in mind for this one.
Best, 
Jane

jz
Posted: January 14, 2017
Thanks for the encouragement, Elke! I'm actually back to working with Auer's first book (open strings only) as my left thumb is presently in a brace - pretty much eliminating any possibility of  holding down strings to sound other notes! (I'm tempted, though, to use this as an opportunity to train myself to learn to play without squeezing.😉👍)
I should be on board for the rhythm part that Beth mentioned by May!

Robyn Stirling
Posted: January 14, 2017
We have to prepare a piece?!?

Elke Meier
Posted: January 14, 2017
Cindy, I can't say anything about Simple Gifts yet,  but on my markup for Carrickfergus Violin 2 I have a retake there. Actually, I have marked all these places because otherwise the retake catches me unawares and the bow slams onto the strings in a hurry :). I will post my markup of V2 once I get to the scanner again, but just to give you my opinion: I read the bow marks that are marked on the sheet as meaning: "Whatever you do up to this point, right here I DO want you to use this kind of bowing." I don't think retakes are necessarily always marked.

One remark about the tenuto sign. I had once a piece of music where I had four eight notes slurred but with a tenuto sign under each. I remember distinctly what it felt like when I first tried this. I thought, this will NEVER work! Either I give each note an emphasis or I slur them. But it actually worked eventually. What I did was have a legato bow stroke (= no stops of the bow in between like with staccato notes on the same bow), but with the index finger I kind of gave a bit of extra weight at the beginning of each note. It is like the index finger of your bow hand tells the audience: "Now, this sounds like it is just going on in one slur, but watch out: There are different important notes in here! And I'll mark them for you."

Cynthia Alpers
Posted: January 14, 2017
Sorry Elke...I know that you started another thread for all these questions, but alas, this one has taken on a life of its own.

It seems like most of this music isn't that hard, but the pieces do have some tricky bowings and shifts here and there.  I'm looking at my version of Fantasy on Simple Gifts, Violin II.  There are some bow markings already on it.  When I put in my own bow markings, they don't coordinate with what's on there already.  :(  I can't figure out what I'm doing wrong. 

For example, in measures 24 through 30, there are a few notes with lines under them, (tenutos.)  I always thought that meant to hold the note for it's full value, but the bow markings show 2 tied notes with 2, opposite bow strokes.  I could understand that if they were really long notes, but these are just quarter and eighth notes.  In some places there are even bow changes on tied and slurred notes where there are no tenutos.   

On another piece, Carrickfergus, violin II, in measure 18, there are a couple of rests.  I'm thinking that the note before those ends on a down bow, then a reset of the bow during the rests, then another down bow.  Yet, there is no mark to indicate that there should be a reset. There are plenty of other reset marks throughout the piece, so I'm guessing that I have that wrong.  I want to make sure that I have that right before I go and memorize the whole piece using the wrong bowings. 

Beth, please advise.  Thanks.

~ C




Elke Meier
Posted: January 14, 2017
Oh Jane, I have the feeling we are all getting a bit nervous about having to function with "intermediate/advanced" people. While I practice I think about the videos I normally post - those are the NICE versions of something :). I don't choose the version where the intonation is off, where the bow skips all over the place, where the left and right hand don't cooperate and produce all sorts of extraneous noises. But the normal practice and playing is FULL of these experience! So, here I am planning to go to a workshop where all of a sudden people will have to put up with my normal practice, not my performance. They will be horrified if they have to put up with my playing - and me too!

But then I think that there WILL be some advanced players. Anne for one, and what I have seen from Lily Mo was also rather advanced. And Beth and Stephen will be there :). So they definitely will be able to play ALL the notes. I have practiced the Canon quite a bit and can play it, but I am still doubtful whether I will ever get the fast sections with the 32th notes up to performance speed. So when I play it with accompaniment at those spots I think: What notes are the important notes that carry the melody line and which are embellishments? Then I try to follow along just with the important notes and forget about the rest. I have hardly started on the Simple Gifts piece, but from what I can see there are some sections I will not be able to play at speed. My fingers are just not that fast. So I will do the same judgement for those sections. And for Simple Gifts I will probably even mark those notes on my sheet music. The same thing you can do with the VII part of the Romance. Just choose the important notes.

I watched the 2014 workshop's live stream after just a bit more than four months of playing. And I learned so, so much even without being there. It was just incredible! For example, Beth's class on how to make decisions for your bowing was a key experience. It has guided me ever since and given me a lot of confidence despite not having a local teacher. And that was with just a few months of playing. I really, really look forward to the teaching this time! It will be much more meaningful now. And as for the ensemble playing: I can hardly wait, even though I sometimes think that the most pronounced learning experience in this will probably be how to not loose your place in the music (or find it again) even if you don't play all the notes :). But that is a valuable experience, and it will still happen in a sea of music I don't normally experience. And if the really advanced people practice their own ensembles I will be able enjoy a live concert for several days - WOW :)

jz
Posted: January 14, 2017
Hi everyone! Even though I have been with the violin long enough to be beyond beginning level, I'd have to say that I'm just an advancing beginner, so I was getting a bit nervous about the workshop. I only just started trying to learn 3rd position and vibrato is off the radar at the moment. Nevertheless, I am excited to come and eager to learn what I can!
Other than the ensemble pieces, should we be preparing anything else?  I thought I remembered that the masterclass in previous workshops had people present pieces they were working on.  
Best to all! 
Jane



Beth Blackerby
Posted: January 13, 2017
Karin, there is also another violin 2 part which is labeled with roman numerals. It is a supportive part to provide the harmony and rhythmic pulse. We really need some people to play that part as well. I intended for beginners to play that part. It's not obvious that it's a separate part, so I wanted to point that out to you. I'm also looking into a few there pieces for a smaller ensemble for beginner players.

Karin Sigg
Posted: January 13, 2017
I am a beginner too, I started 2 years ago. These workshop pieces are difficult for me too. But I don't want to get nervious about it. I will practise and do my best. everybody is at the level he is and in the end counts that we enjoy it and have a good time playing together.
So happy practising to everybody!


Katja
Posted: January 12, 2017
With less than two years behind me, I will rreally have to work for this. I enrolled to the workshop before it was announced intermediate/advanced. Or then I missed that bit of the information. But Beth encouraged me to go for it anyways and I'm sure I will get a lot out of this and would have regret ted missing the opportunity. To get the most out of the workshop, I am determined to learn all the pieces. In the workshop I might be able to follow  others a bit better or become a D droner 😉, we'll see. For me it becomes easier to play my own part if I also know more or less the other parts.

Well, anyways I will have plenty of violintime this spring, lessons twice a week and orchestra once a week, maybe that will help to become less shy in the workshop.

Cynthia Alpers
Posted: January 12, 2017
Maria - Really?  It starts in 3rd?  I was playing most of in in 1st.  OMG...I'd better put my glasses on...LOL.  Thanks for the heads up.

Beth - Thank you, thank you, thank you!  At the 1st workshop we players in the back were nicknamed, the "D droners."  Now, I can move on up and become an "A droner."  Ha, ha! :D 

Actually, after I posted this question, I realized that I could play those two double stops, if I shifted, but it still looks tricky.  I'll stick with playing an open A on both of those notes in that measure...easy peasy.

~ C

Cynthia Alpers
Posted: January 12, 2017
Elke, I think that you're very brave and I admire that...LOL.  You're just slightly ahead of me in your studies (I started the violin March 27, 2014) and probably way ahead of me in your playing abilities. (Geesh...You would think by now, I could do a perfect Twinkle.) Still, even with almost 3 years under my belt, I knew right away that I could not take on both Violin I and II parts.  I give you credit.

To be honest, I was a beginner and completely in over my head at the 2015 workshop.  I'm just hoping to tread water at this one.  I don't want discourage anyone from attending.  It's all good and you'll learn tons of stuff, regardless of your playing level.  That being said, Beth did say that this is a workshop for more advanced students, so try to find where you will fit in.  I say, if you can do it, then go for it. If not, then take the simpler parts and enjoy the ride.

My personal strategy this time around is to try to be more relaxed in the ensemble, hopefully, by playing easier parts and to focus most of my learning on technique, as much as I can.  Having a live teacher that can show me these things in person...that's' is a total luxury for me. Therefore, I'm aiming for parts II, or even III, for all pieces.  Even those have techniques that I haven't learned yet, so they're still going to be a big challenge for me.  Plus, just trying to play the entire duration is tough in my book.  I'm a wimp when it comes to playing for long periods of time. 

That's my 2 cents on that.  :D

~ C




Stephen, Los Osos, CA
Posted: January 11, 2017
Hi Elke,

Kudos for attempting this piece.  I'm presently at
a 4 note slur limit so this is out of my range for some time.

I do have a fondness for Shostakovitch and love Romance.

I am especially thankful for the link to Miss Benedetti's 
Prom's performance.  Top notch performance in high
definition with a clear soundtrack. That one's going on my
Favorite's list!

Elke Meier
Posted: January 11, 2017
Oh, thank you, Beth! That was very helpful! And yes, I am very aware of the requirements... But I will still give this a few more days before I decide whether there will be time enough till May to do both.

How special, Rustam, that you would take the time to explain your fingering. You made me laugh when you said you were taking the lazy way out. I doubt this! My original fingering had me only change positions 9 times, you changed positions 19 times! That does not sound very lazy to me :). You don't seem to have a problem going from a third finger on a lower string to a first finger on the higher string. This is extremely hard for me, so a number of the shifts I have in my sheet are exactly to avoid this combination, whereas your shifts introduced this situation.

Karen, you definitely overestimate my work ethics here :). I don't think I would have touched this yet. Not because of the 16th notes. They are actually not so bad. But the shifting and the intonation for all the flat notes is a real challenge. But this is one of the workshop pieces, so that is how it crossed my path - or better: my music stand. And it is very, very beautiful.

Beth Blackerby
Posted: January 11, 2017
Elke, here are a few other fingering suggestions. You'll see alternative fingerings in parentheses as well as with an asterisk. 

I don't mean to sound harsh, and I say this in a general sense to all workshop participants: If anyone can't play through the part with relative ease and understanding of the technical requirements of the part, then I advise you to pick an easier part. It's always good to take on challenges with regards to personal repertoire, but in an ensemble you want to be as comfortable as possible. There's so much to pay attention to in an orchestra setting, so you don't want to be so absorbed in your part that you can't be aware of everything going on around you. 

Also remember that if you learn the first part, you have to learn the second part as well.

Cindy, those double stops will be played divisi, so you'll only be playing one of the notes. 

Elke Meier
Posted: January 11, 2017
Cindy, you do it right: You start on violin II... :)

I started on violin I because I liked the melody so much. But eventually I also have to work on violin II. Measure 14 I would do in fourth position: First finger for the Ab/A on the D-string, third finger for the F on the G-string. - Well, not quite true. I can hardly do double stops in first position. Why would I think that I could do it in fourth position?? So I will probably just play the Ab and A and ignore the F...

With these pieces where I have to figure out shifting and fingering myself I find the Fingering Chart for All Keys that I made a long time ago extremely helpful. I just lined up the frames to find out where I could finger those two notes together. Check out Violin Practice and Performance in the Resources section for the link and for the explanatory video (it is in the chart section toward the bottom).

Cynthia Alpers
Posted: January 11, 2017
Hi Elke,

I so glad that you posted this because I was just going to post a question about this piece, as well.  I hope I'm not hijacking your thread here.  Sorry...I can't answer your question.  I'm working on the Violin II part.  I'd like to know how to play measure 14 on part 2.  The are 2 double stops in that measure.  One is an A natural and F, in first position on the D and A strings, which is OK...I can do that.  But the other one is an A flat and F in the same position and strings and THAT I don't know how to do. 



KarenJ
Posted: January 11, 2017
I like how you see something you like and just do it.  Most people(I, for one) would see 16th notes and long slurs and blow right by this.  I love your desire and work ethic.

Ying
Posted: January 11, 2017
I play this but it's different, played in higher positions and with double stops. First 4 bars entirely on G string. My G string has some wolf tones so .... not always ideal.

Rustam Gill
Posted: January 11, 2017
Hi Elke,
Because you asked and because I think it would be a good exercise for myself to map out the fingerings for a piece, I will share with you what I came up with. Of course. feel free to ignore it if you get better opinions :-)

**After analyzing the music I would play it in first and third position (using pinky extension for the open harmonics) as that is where I am comfortable. I am still working on intonation in second and fourth position and am not as confident. I realized that most of my shifts to third position use either a ringing tone or a harmonic to make intonation easier. I think this piece is arranged to allow you to take advantage of these kinds of shifts. However, stylistically maybe you don't want to do that. According to your markings you are not taking the lazy way out like I am :) Personally I would learn it with easier fingerings and see how it sounds, then change the fingerings at spots to see how it sounds.**

Here are the shifts I would use one by one:
-I would start in third position and shift down to first position on the measure 5 B.
-I would play the 16th note run at the end of measure 5 all on the D string (4th finger for the A).
-I would shift back up to third position at the beginning of measure 8 to get some good vibrato on the E then shift back down to first position after the D for the slur and up-bow staccato combination.
-Then, the hardest shift so far: go up to third position E after the quick 32nd notes (again to get a good vibrato on E. **it seems like the music doesn't really require these last two shifts but personally I would experiment with them**
-I would come back down to first position quickly afterwards for the C on measure 10.
-Shift up to third position for the Aflat on measure 11. I would stay in third position for the next measure and play the Eflat on G string.
-Measure 14 is a puzzle. I would probably stay in third position because it seems like some 4th finger vibrato is hard to avoid in these next few measures. The D flat I would reach back with the 1st finger to play. Then that C would be a big stretch with the fourth finger to play on the D string.
-Shift down to first again at the G in the middle of measure 16. At the breath mark on measure 17 I would scrunch my fingers together in first position for the chromatic 16th notes and play dsharp-e-f with my first, second, and third fingers, respectively. Then shift back up to third position for the A.
-Measure 18 I would use the open G right before the measure to go back to first position.
-Stay in first until the B on measure 20 I would go back to third position and then back down to first for the D.
-Measure 23 I would shift up to third position for the C (harder to tune because there are no ringing tones here so listen for the interval :))
-Measure 24 I would play the high E as a harmonic. Measure 25 I would go down to first position during the open E and play in the 32nd notes in first position. Then I would again shift up on the harmonic E, using it to help me find the correct intonation for the D and C right afterwards. **I noticed you marked measure 24 with a shift to fourth position. I think this is because Beth teaches to avoid using the harmonic too often. This is probably the correct way to play it if advanced. However, I have a feeling that this piece is designed to be played in first and third and the arrangement intends for you to play the E as a harmonic. Of course, if you can play it in tune in fourth position without a harmonic, more power to you.**
-Stay in third position till measure 28, I would do a shift on the first finger from G to Eflat taking me to first position.
-Measure 31 I would play the E in first position but you could shift there for better vibrato on a stronger finger.
-Measure 32 I would shift up to third position for the A.
-Stay in third position until the rest on measure 35. I would shift down to first at the open G.
-Finally I would shift up to third position on measure 37 on my 2nd finger at the E. Play the A as a harmonic and stay in third position for the C.

Hope this helps and isn't too confusing. Good luck! This sounds like a beautiful piece!

Katja
Posted: January 10, 2017

I don't know what Beth is planning for the ws regarding fingering and bowing, but at least in my little ensemble my teacher lets us use whatever fingerings (although she suggest fingerings (and sometimes  this is the only way she will accept) and there might also be individual suggestions as we are not all on the same level), but regarding bowings, she wants us to use the same bowings at least in performances (it will look pretty messy otherwise) (and to be honest, this is somewhat frustrating as she keeps changing ithem over and over again). 

So for the ws pieces, I am struggeling a bit with the bowings - not so much in this piece - but with the Carrickfergus and the Fantasy as there are the original bowings and then some changes and I keep wondering which one we should choose. 

I will bring all ws pieces to my lessons (starting again on saturday) so I don't need to work alone 😃. And fingers crossed that my teacher will not alter everything...

I also have as a.goal to have some kind of a vibrato to the workshop (and yes, you gave me a valid reason to change  my fingering for the end, pinky vibrato will be too challenging here too)

Elke Meier
Posted: January 10, 2017
Maria, watch out for the Ab in measure 11. Yours was too high. Here are a few links to  performances of this Romance:
Nicola Benedetti in a masterclass - oh, I just watched this again, I think I have to revise my bowings...
Nicola Benedetti in a performance
No idea who did this

Elke Meier
Posted: January 10, 2017
I have a hard time reaching with the #4, Katja. So I chose reaching just in one little slur in measure 25.

And I did not want to end on the last long note with the fourth finger. I still have not given up hope that by May I might be able to do something similar to a vibrato. But it will definitely NOT be a fourth finger vibrato over two measures...

Sometimes I felt shifting was easier than going from a third finger on the lower string to a first finger on a higher string (my third finger really is rather stiff and weak). And for the sextoles (not sure I have the right name here - I mean the fast notes in measure 23) I actually found it easier for the fingering the higher position than in first position. Now I just need to figure out how to find the right note in third position on the G-string. :)

What I am not sure about is whether I can just choose to use whatever shifts I think would be good. Or whether there are some "proper" shifts one should use in certain places. Also, I don't know whether in ensemble playing everyone is supposed to use the same shifts.

Katja
Posted: January 10, 2017
Elke, I'm sure I have less experience than you, but this is how I play measure 23, first note reach with fourth finger and shifting to 3rd poistion from the last note of the measure. Then back to 1st position in measure 25 and again to third position again after fast notes. In measure 34 I reach again and for the last last Cs I tend to go to 2nd pos. Might be completely stupid - so wait for other suggestions.

 I fell in love with this piece - so beautiful, I just hope I won't ruin it with my playing

Maria
Posted: January 10, 2017
Elke,

Thanks 4 the pix, can i print it?

It was so cold last couple of days surely my vio strings were loose now, sigh let me dry to sightread this one...