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Robyn Stirling
Hi everyone,
A question of cheekiness/ utter laziness/ terror of string breakage.
I'm going to see a luthier about changing my tailpiece and possibly getting the bridge readjusted as I'm sqeaking in odd places, so here's the question; the A and D strings really need replaced, the A more so as it's craking on the bridge, would it be really cheeky of me to ask my luthier to change them when the instrument is being restrung? I have strings but a notoriously bad history of changing them. Also out of curiosity what string does everyone use on their instrument. I'd been using Dominants but when I upgraded my violin the new (old) one came with a Pirastro E string which made such a difference was wondering if it would be worthwhile upgrading to a full set at some point. i.e when I've used all my other ones u
Robyn Stirling
7 Responses
Posted: January 8, 2017
Last Comment: January 13, 2017
Replies

Diane in SOCAL
Posted: January 13, 2017
Hi Thanks for the response….sounds like you are all set. Great that you went to the luthier and he was able to take care of all the issues.  Yes, Obligatos are nice…they are more gut-like in sound.  A set of strings on one violin will not sound the same on another instrument.  So, it's a good idea to try different sets to see which one you prefer.
So glad you were able to get professional help.  Play on. 
Stay tuned. Diane in SoCal

Robyn Stirling
Posted: January 12, 2017
Hi Diane, bridge was filed, pegs reshaped as they were sticking and protruding too far from the peg box. The string when I bought it were Dominants on G to A and a Pirastro on E. To be honest I don't know how long they had been on but the A was cutting into bridge hence to reshaping. I've just gone for new Dominants and Pirastro gold E but contemplating a set of Obligatos next time. 

Diane in SOCAL
Posted: January 11, 2017
Hi Robyn.  Did you get new strings placed as well…Sometimes on fiddles bought off the internet they come with very cheap strings…they squeak and sqwach!!!! If new string were put on what string brand did you get?  Glad you have the new tailpiece put on with the fine tuner on the E string.  How does it sound and is it easier to tune?  Did the luthier do any thing else to the violin???
Stay tuned. Diane in SoCal 

Robyn Stirling
Posted: January 11, 2017
New tailpiece. Lightweight wood with titanium adjuster.


Robyn Stirling
Posted: January 8, 2017
Thank you so much Diane and Ted that has been a great help, will check back in tomorrow after I've been to the luthier. :)

Diane in SOCAL
Posted: January 8, 2017
A trip to the luthier.
Hi Robyn.  Yes, changing strings when a new tailpiece is being put on is a very good idea. What tailpiece are you getting.  I hope it is a Wittner, as these are the best with fine tuners built into the tailpiece…this particular tailpiece is made of a composite material. I would not use a metal tailpiece with fine tuners. 
Strings come in all different brands.  The Dominants E string is notoriously squeaky. Here at our violin shop in SoCal…we use the Lenzner, Goldbrokat E string in 0.28 gauge…0.27 is a bit thinner.  They are not expensive either, about $3.  We have been experimenting with some new strings by D'Addario, their Kaplan line of Amo's (medium gauge) which have a nice warm, mellow tone and the Vivo's (also mediums)which are more lively and bright. So it depends on what your looking for in the way of tone and how your instrument will respond to any given set of strings. While your at the luthiers…have them check to make sure the bridge is correct in place, that the nut height is not to hi and that the sound post is in the correct position. When the luthier changes your strings..have them check to make sure your pegs turn smoothly…this is good maintenance and will ensure that the instrument is working properly and last longer…it's like a trip to the doctor.  If you buy a set of strings from the luthier then he will put them on for you on charge…that is what we do here at our shop.  Good luck and don't be afraid to ask for help at the luthiers. Developing a good relationship with your luthier is very important…they want to be of service to you as well and give you excellent care with your instrument…knowing you will come back when it's time. Check to see if the bow needs to be rehired as well.  You mind as well get it all done if needed.  Stay tune. Diane in SoCal

Ted Adachi
Posted: January 8, 2017
If you pay your luthier to change your strings then that's not cheeky. 

I tried Dominants and then I replaced them with Pirastro Evahs which were louder and a lot more resonant, at least on my violin. If you buy a set of strings from your luthier they might include installation as part of the price.